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Accessible Housing

Accessible Housing

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Introduction

"Accessible Housing" refers to the construction or modification of your home, through renovation or home modification of housing, to enable independent living for persons with disabilities. Accessibility is achieved through Universal Accessible Design, but also by integrating accessibility features such as modified furniture, assistive devices, shelves, cupboards, electronic devices and Home Automation Products.

Access is typically defined within the limits of what a person sitting in a wheelchair is able to reach with arm movement only, with minimal shifting of the legs and torso. Most houses in South Africa are not originally designed to accommodate wheelchair users or the elderly. Homeowners may therefore be challenged by the need to find designers and renovators familiar with accessible design issues.

Organizations & Companies That Can Assist With Universal Design & Access

There are however individuals, organizations & companies such as Inclusive Design that focuses on implementing Universal Access solutions in a wide variety of architectural and urban design projects, as well as providing Access Solutions on accessibility issues in higher education environments, workplaces, housing and urban design.

Inclusive Design

Inclusive Design is a company founded on the fundamentals of the South African Constitution and aims to serve as a driver of social inclusion for positive and effective change in the lives of people with diverse human needs. Our philosophy is guided by individual and shared needs of people and not that of special needs. Universal Design serves as a means in which to create and enhance the functionality of environments, services and products, for the widest range of users, recognizing diversity of the human condition. Inclusive Design as a company, recognises the importance of awareness raising and the dissemination of information on diversity and inclusion as an integral deliverable to achieve Universal Access and improving lives.Inclusive Design

What we do:

Inclusive Design serves as a mechanism to audit, review, design, create and advise on adaptations and/or enhancements for the functionality of environments, transport, technology, education, services and operations, and products for all users, to accommodate the full spectrum of human diversity. Inclusive Design specialises in providing practical, sensible advice on issues relating to Universal Access and works on the premise that environments, services and facilities that are accessible to people with disabilities are equitable in the eyes of the law, makes business sense, as well as being easier and more comfortable for all users, irrespective of their functional requirements.

1.    BUSINESS CONCEPT:

Inclusive Design works with clients to find viable, feasible means of incorporating universal design into their environments, services, facilities and products. In a field of consulting where amateurs are rife and claim expertise, Inclusive Design has gone to great lengths to prove their competency on an international level. Headed by a consultant who is the highest certified Universal Access Consultant in South Africa, as verified by IAAP (International Association of Access Professionals) and with a plenary of examples and experience, Inclusive Design delivers, on time with exceptionally detailed results and recommendations. We put effort into making reports and findings legible, easy to understand and implementable to enable clients to positively affect change to becoming universally accessible and inclusive.

Services:

Inclusive Design

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Universal Access Consulting:

Consulting serves to advise clients on the options, requirements and areas where Universal Access can and should be achieved. With experience and knowledge of both South African building regulations for Persons with Disabilities, supporting equality legislation and international access requirements, Inclusive Design makes for the perfect collaborator to achieve Universal Access. Our consulting services serve to impart knowledge with clients on aspects, features and implementation of Universal Access to increase awareness of the requirements of people with disabilities as well as the broader range of beneficiaries including, pregnant women, people with young children, elderly people and people with temporary disabilities or recovering from surgery.

As part of our consulting services we also offer specific research, skills transfer and mentorship related to Universal Access and assist our clients wherever possible to progress towards a viable, feasible and desirable means of implementation to achieve equality. In line with the social model of disability, our emphasis has shifted away from the concept of being ‘disability’ focused, to that of being focused on ‘Universal Access’, which acknowledges that the benefit thereof goes beyond the classification of people with disabilities. Universal Access Consulting can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)
  • systems, services and operations
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and systems
  • Policy development, reviews and updates

Universal Access Auditing:

Universal Access Consulting

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Auditing is the examination or inspection of various aspects of the environment, service, facility or product to determine compliance with local and/or international requirements. Audits are conducted through physical inspection and are followed by reports to indicate short-falls, areas of improvement and areas of non-compliance. Universal Access Auditing is largely conducted in the built environment in South Africa, where SANS 10400 Part S (2011): Facilities for Persons with Disabilities is the deem to satisfy requirement, which is supplemented with ISO21542 in areas where more details are required or environments which are more specialised. This process is detailed, and the audit is conducted meticulously and often includes discussions with users of the facility regarding usability, which leads to a custom report with bespoke recommendations for both built infrastructure and operations.

Inclusive Design also offers companies an advantage through a proprietary Universal Access Application™ which enables large areas of the built environment to be audited in a systematic, accurate, thorough and detailed process (for example: a campus). Saving clients time and money as the UA App captures vast amounts of data, with measurements, photo evidence and SANS 10400 Part S (2011) compliance in an easy to read, tabulated format, in a matter of days. This process conventionally takes a vast number of human hours to capture, process and write-up by a highly experience UA Auditor, but with the Universal Access App™ it is simplified, quickened, accurate and unbiased. 

Universal Access Auditing can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)- with the UA App™
  • systems, services and operation
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and system
  • policy and implementation plans

Universal Access Awareness:

Universal Access Audits & Reviews

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

The Great Father of our Nation, Nelson Mandela said that “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” It is our belief, at Inclusive Design, that by teaching principles of good design, that we can make a significant impact upon our society. It is therefore always a recommended deliverable in our work to transfer skills and educate others on Universal Design and Universal Access. The capacitation of more people with the knowledge and understanding of the value that inclusive design offers to staff, clients and society, is part of our vision and what we strive to achieve. What we term Universal Access Awareness, can be customised to the clients’ needs, and can vary from an introductory presentation to an in-depth training session on specific aspects. Universal Access cannot be achieved without at least the basic understanding of the paradigm that leads to equality.

Additional Services:

  • Disability Awareness Training (also known as Disability Awareness Training or Sensitisation)
  • Disability Specific Monitoring and Evaluation (Qualified M and E services)

Business Competitiveness:

Universal Access is a broad concept that requires understanding, application, implementation, experience and governance around various sectors, such as the built environment, services, facilities, transport, technology, regulations and more. Inclusive Design has explicit experience in Policy, Guideline and Framework writing and advising, Technical Requirement writing, Implementation Plans, Onsite Auditing, Plan Drawing Auditing, Architectural and Planning Consulting, Auditing and Consulting in the realms of Transport, Marketing and Communication, and Training. Inclusive Design is not focused on a specific area of disability, and therefore offer holistic recommendations in order to accommodate a spectrum of users, irrespective of their abilities. Inclusive Design practice good business principles, deliver on time, communicate directly with clients, and offer superior project deliverables.

If there are any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at Inclusive Design on Tel: +27 72 027 3623 or Email: colette@inclusivedesign.co.za at Cape Town (HQ) ● Pretoria (Administration), or visit our website at: www.inclusivedesign.co.za

Public Buildings

The Government have put laws in place to insure that new public buildings are designed and build with certain features to make them accessible to persons with disabilities. The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act deals with facilities for persons with disabilities, and includes access to public areas. City streets, public buildings and restrooms are some of the more visible changes but also included, are the installation of elevators, automatic doors, wide doors and corridors, transit lifts, wheelchair rampwheelchair ramps, curb cuts, and the elimination of unnecessary steps where ramps and elevators are not available, thus allowing persons who use wheelchairs and other Assistive Devices to be able to use public sidewalks and public transit more easily and safely.

These features that have been introduced by the Government, are referred to as "Accessible Features" and are dealt with in detail on our "Accessible Features" Page, however many public areas and buildings are still not compliant to regulations, while some new buildings walkways and parks are still being designed and built without consultation from a Universal Access Consultant and are therefore often not compliant. This ultimately leads to disappointment when these facilities are not accessible and further costs to alter these venues to become accessible to all persons with disabilities.

If you are going to be altering or building a new place of residence or business, please do the right thing and contact a Universal Access Consultant such as Inclusive Design to make sure that your new residence or business is compliant, or please Contact Us if you know of any new public buildings or venues are not accessible.

Making Your House Accessible

Disability can effect anyone at any time, and many people struggle later in life due to old age, which often leads to the need in creating an accessible hazard free home. Many senior citizens try to retain their independence by staying at home for as long as possible by adding ramps, handrails, grab bars, etc. throughout their home to improve accessibility and reduce the risk of falling.

In your own home you're not necessarily limited to the government standards set aside for public buildings, but these regulations are put in place for your own safety and before making these types of adaptions to your home, you should acquire the services of Universal Access Consultants and builders who specialize in accessibility, to make sure that any adaptions done will assist you as much as possible. You may also require plans or permits for the adaptions that you want to make.

There are a variety of areas where adaptations and assistive devices can improve accessibility for persons with mobility impairments, especially for those in wheelchairs, they include:

  • Ramps
  • Gates, Doors & Doorways
  • Light switches & other controls
  • Multi-Story Homes
  • Accessible Bedrooms
  • Accessible Bathrooms

Ramps

Depending on the design of your home, your type of wheelchair, and your physical abilities, ramps can take on different sizes and shapes. Various size ramps can be purpose built out of wood, cement or metal, while a variety small 1 or 2 step Pre Manufactured Ramps made out of rubber or metal are available to purchase from various companies in South Africa, these include small thresh hold Ramps to get you over that half a step, as well as slightly longer Ramps to get you over a full step. Visit our "Hoists, Lifts, Ramps & Transferring Aids - Pre Manufactured Small Ramps section" to find out more about these types of ramps and the companies that sell them.

Longer metal ramps are also available and can be bought from a number of companies in South Africa. These ramps can be permanent or temporary and can be removed at a later stage, if the ramps are no longer necessary. Visit our "Hoists, Lifts, Ramps & Transferring Aids - Pre Manufactured Long Ramps section" to find out more about these types of ramps and the companies that sell them.

If you choose to build a ramp, the government standard for ramps is 1:12, in your own home you are not necessarily limited to the government standard. A steeper or less steep ramp may be preferred when evaluating space limitations or other considerations, you may require a longer gradual ramp, if you use a manual wheelchair, or a slightly steeper ramp if you are restricted with space, however the government standards are put in place for your safety, so you should get the advice of a Universal Access Consultant such as Inclusive Design to make sure that any adaptions that you make, do not put yourself or others in danger. You would also need to ensure that your ramps are slip resistant and are not dangerous to other people who have to walk up them, installing handrails can assist with this. To view other safety tips and the government regulations for ramps, stairs & Hand Rails, click the "Ramps" button on the top-left of the page or click on the link below to find out more.

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If you need advice or are unsure about what design would best suite you, we recommended you consult a Universal Access Consultant who can help you design a ramp that is safe and meets your particular needs. To view information about ramps that are available to purchase in South Africa, please visit our "Hoists, Lifts, Ramps & Transferring Aids - Ramps" Page

Gates, Doors & Doorwaysdoor opener

Gates: Due to the high crime rate, many people choose to have automatic security gates installed, which are not only handy to keep you safe, but can also provide you with easy access to your property and house. You can attach a control for your front gate to your wheelchair, so that you can come and go as you please. These controls can also be fitted to the security gate or on your front door. Please Contact Us if you require any further information.

Doorways & Hallways: Most wheelchairs are generally built narrower than the width of a doorway, so under most circumstances you should not have a problem getting through doorways with a wheelchair, unless you are required to turn around sharp corners, however some security gates on front doors, make the doorway narrower so this can make it very difficult for some wheelchair users to exit or enter these doorways. You may need to adapt these gates to give you more space, or you can even use special off-set hinges to allow the door to open further.

As mentioned above, going around sharp corners can also prove difficult if you use a wheelchair, some off-road Motorized wheelchairs can make this even more difficult, so you should take this into consideration when you're choosing what type of wheelchair to buy or where you are going to live if you use a wheelchair. You may however have to do some remodeling, if you want to be able to drive directly into a room, contact a Universal Access Consultant such as Inclusive Design to make sure that any adaptions you have done, will give you the most benefits, or Contact Us if you require any information about the different types of wheelchairs that are available in South Africa.

Unlocking & Opening Doors: When it comes to unlocking and opening doors, there are a variety of options to choose from, depending on the degree of your disability and the amount of money you have available to spend. Various solutions include:

  • Lowering the door handle: Door handles can be lowered or changed, so that they are easier reach and open. Straps can also be fitted to the door handle that can assist with this.
  • Installing number-code locks with key pads on your doors: They are easier to negotiate than keys and can allow you to provide access to the house to people if you can't get to the door. You can tell them the code over the phone.
  • Automatic door openers: There are a wide variety of different types of door openers available. This is dealt with in detail on our "Home Automation Page" on the "Door Openers" section.

Light Switches & Other Controls

Housemate Home Control

Image Courtesy of Edit Microsystems

Light switches and other controls, like those used to control alarm system, music, heating, air conditioning, etc. can all be moved so that they can be reached and should not be below or above the reach of a persons who use a wheelchair.

Home Automation is another solution that allows older adults & persons with disabilities to control there environment. Homes that are automated are called Smart Homes, they offer the elderly and persons with disabilities a wide variety of benefits including:

  • Independence: By supplying the elderly or persons with disabilities control over their environment, they are able to gain independence and therefore re-gain their confidence and determination.
  • Safety: Smart Homes can also provide both older adults and persons with disabilities many different types of emergency assistance systems, security features, fall prevention, automated timers, & alerts. These systems allow for the individual to feel secure in their homes knowing that help is only minutes away. Smart home systems will make it possible for family members to monitor their loved ones from anywhere with an internet connection.

Thanks to these benefits and others the elderly are able to stay in their homes where they feel comfortable, instead of moving to a costly health care facility. If you decide to opt for Home Automation, you may want to consider a generator as a backup in case the power goes out, which is a real concern here in South Africa during these times. There are a variety of companies that specialize in the supply and installation of Home Automation products in South Africa. To find out more about the different types of Home Automation products and most common elements, please click the Home Automation button on the top left or on the link below.

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Multi-Story Homes

Unfortunately some persons who are staying in a home or apartment that has 2 or more floors (Multi-story home) may get a disability, or develop a Mobility Impairment as they get older. If this is the case, it often becomes difficult or impossible for them to maneuver from one floor to the next. Sometimes moving homes is not an option and the only alternative is the installation of some type of lift. There are 3 options to consider, they include:

  • The Stair Lift
  • Elevator or Lift
  • Platform Lift

There are various companies in South Africa that supply, install and service these types of equipment, you should get expert advice on what type of elevator or lift would best suit the building that you live in, as well as the type of disability that you have. Please click the "Hoists, Lifts & Transfer Aids" button on the top left or on the link below, to find out more about these types of products that are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them.

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Accessible Bedroomswheelchiar accessible rooms

Creating an accessible bedroom is very important in retaining your independence, especially for those who use wheelchairs to move about. Many persons with mobility Impairments do not have the luxury of a lot of space, but putting a bit of thought into how you set-up and lay out your bedroom, along with using a variety of assistive devices, can improve your accessibility and help you become a lot more independent.

TV & Music: Most people including myself enjoy listening to music and watching movies and TV. A large screen Smart TV in the bedroom, that I can operate whether I am up in my wheelchair or lying in bed is a "must" for many persons with disabilities including myself. You should also consider setting up your TV, so that you can see and operate it, no matter which side you face when lying in bed. If you have a shortage of space, you may want to mount your TV on a wall. There are a wide variety of assistive devices, which we call "TV & Music Aids", that can assist you to operate this equipment, so that we enjoy these hobbies without to much extra assistance. Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them.

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Books & Reading: If you enjoy books and reading but have a Mobility Impairment, you may find it difficult to hold a book or turn pages. There are however a variety of Reading Aids which are available for persons with mobility impairments and elderly that can assist them to enjoy a book whether they are sitting up or lying in bed. Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them. Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them.

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Beds: Persons with Mobility Impairments often require various Pressure Care products to assist them to reduce the chance of developing pressure sores. One of these products that are very important, are Adjustable or Home Care Beds. These are especially useful for persons who you use a wheelchair and need assistance turning, you should also consider the size of the bed you require and how much room is needed around your bed so that you can get in and out of your wheelchair and onto the bed. Adjustable Beds are available in a variety of different wheelchair accessible room-hoistmodels, types & sizes, Adjustable Double Beds are generally more expensive, but offer a lot of benefits, including pressure relief, turning with a Draw Sheet and allowing you to easily be able to work or eat a meal if laid up in bed. Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them. Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them.

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Transferring: Transferring from the bed to the wheelchair or visa-versa, may require a hoist. There are many different types and styles. Some Hoists are installed on the wall or ceiling, while others have wheels, which are used to roll the Hoist around the room. Depending on the type of Hoist you decide on, you may need more room, or some clearance under your bed. The type of transfer method you employ will dictate how much space you require around your bed, and where the bed is positioned. Find out more about the types of Hoists that are available. Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them.

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Work Space: Whether you work from home or go out to work, you should make sure that you have an accessible work space, with not only the right type of computer equipment to meet your needs, but also have some form of desk that is adjustable for you to work at th right height. Whether you use a laptop or desktop, you'll want a good, comfortable working area that is made at the perfect height, so that you can sit under the desk and move side-to-side. It should be raised at the right height to give you easy access to our telephone, keyboard, reading materials and remote controls. If you use a mouth stick, typing stick or voice operated software, you will want easy access to your assistive devices like headphones, mouth stick holder etc.

Please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them, which also includes various types of desks.

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Accessible Bathrooms

Persons with Mobility Impairments, especially those who use wheelchairs generally require an Accessible Bathroom to be as independent as possible. An Accessible Bathroom is a special bathroom designed to accommodateen suite bathroom persons with physical disabilities. An accessible en suite bathroom is very handy, as it not only gives you more privacy, but it also gives you quick access to a bathroom where you can lay out your accessories as you want them, the bathroom is attached to your bedroom which means that guests are less likely to use it. These Accessible Bathrooms can be designed to meet your specific needs and do not need to follow The National Standard for Building Regulations which Accessible Bathrooms in public buildings are required to follow, these  are sometimes known as Disabled Toilets or Wheelchair Toilets.

These Accessible Public Toilets or Bathrooms can present accessibility challenges for some people who use Scooters or Wheelchairs, as these Assistive Devices are available in various sizes and need to be able to fit next to the toilet, so that transferring between the wheelchair and the toilet seat is possible. Accessible Toilets are designed to address these issues by providing more space and Grab Rails for users to be able to grab onto and hold during transfers.

The National Standard for Building Regulations makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & built with a certain amount of Disabled Toilets in them and that these toilets are accessible for persons with various disabilities and need to meet certain regulations to be accessible to all persons with disabilities. If you are going to be altering or building a new complex, shopping centre, public building or business, you are required to contact a Universal Access Consultant such as Inclusive Design to make sure that your plans are compliant, please Contact Us if you need any assistance, or click on the link below to find out more about the National Standard for Building Regulations and other companies and organisations that can assist you.

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As mentioned above, Accessible Bathrooms in the home do not need to meet these same regulations, as public Accessible Toilets and Bathrooms, in that Public Bathrooms do not normally include a bath or shower and need to meet the needs of a wide variety different people. "Everybody is different", some people are happy to "Bed Bath", while others prefer to bath or shower. The type of Mobility Impairment you have, and your preference in your "bathroom routines", will determine what type of "Bathroom Aids" you will need, which will therefore determine what type bathroom adaption's need to be done. There are several alternatives, whether you prefer to bath or shower, please click on the link below, to find out more about these types of products which are available in South Africa and the companies that sell them.

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Bath: Some people with mobility impairments still prefer to bath. Many bathrooms come with baths already installed and therefore require less alterations. You may require Hand Rails to assist you to get in or out of the bath, but if you have a severe mobility Impairment, you may require a Bath Lift to get in and out the bath. There are a variety of different types of Bath Lifts available, you will need to choose one that is suited to you. some of these lifts are easy to install, while other Bath Lifts may require slight alterations to your bathroom to be able to install these lifts.

Shower: If you prefer to shower and you use a wheelchair, you may need to transfer onto a shower seat, or use a commode to be able to shower. Either way, you will probably need to do alterations to make the shower open plan and wheelchair friendly. If you do require an open plan bathroom, we recommended you consult a reputable builder and architect or universal access consultant who can help you design and build a bathroom that is safe and meets your particular needs.Dave Lewis Guest Lodge

Remember to make sure that the builder uses non-slip tiles on the floor and slope this floor correctly, so that the water drains away properly. To find more about the bathroom aids listed above, as well as number of other accessories that can assist you to make your bathroom more accessible.

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If you need advice or are unsure about what design would best suite you, we recommended you consult a Universal Access Consultant like Colette Fransolet - Inclusive Design, who can help you adapt your home to suite your particular needs.

Dave Lewis Guest Lodge

Finding Accessible Housing while traveling in and around South Africa can be difficult, but thanks to organizations such as QASA, and projects like "The Dave Lewis Guest Lodge", this dose not need to be a problem. The David Lewis Lodge is a guest Lodge facility owned by QASA. It is situated in Edenvale, Johannesburg and provides accessible accommodation for wheelchair users and also has support of equipment like hoists, commodes and specialised bedding. A semi pool, Jacuzzi and boma facility complement the Lodge. If you would like to make a booking or have any enquiries please contact Louise on: 031 767 0348 or louiseqasa@iafrica.com

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

Accessible Features & Disabled Parking Discs

Service Providers

Accessible Features & Disabled Parking Discs

To view the suppliers of products that are available in your area, click the button to the right.
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Products & Equipment

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

Persons with disabilities are often excluded from many events, services, information, communication, products and venues because during the planning phases all users were not considered. This can be prevented by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase. Government Regulations have been put in place in South Africa and around the world to try to make public places more accessible to persons with disabilities, including persons with Mobility Impairments. These government regulations are known as Accessible Features and they are meant to ensure that accommodation and transport is accessible and that equal opportunities and rights are available for persons with disabilities. In the article below, we will discuss the Accessible Features that have been introduced in order to make public places more accessible to persons with Mobility Impairments, as well as the companies and organizations that can assist to secure: funding, accessibility, safety, equal opportunities and equal rights for persons with disabilities.

Effective civil rights legislation is sought in order to secure the rights & access to public areas such as city streets, public buildings and restrooms. A noticeable change recently in some parts of the world is the installation of elevators, automatic doors, wide doors and corridors, transit lifts, wheelchair ramps, curb cuts, and the elimination of unnecessary steps where ramps and elevators are not available, allowing persons who use wheelchairs and other Mobility Aids to use public sidewalks and public transit easier and safely.

The Government often makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & built with certain features to make them wheelchair friendly. These are known as The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act, which was amended and published by the Department of Trade and Industry in May 2008. Some parts of the Act Part S deals with facilities for persons with disabilities and directly affected the building industry. They include information about:

  • Disabled Toilets
  • Ramps
  • Disabled Parking Bays
  • Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts

Unfortunately many buildings and most houses in South Africa were not designed and built to accommodate wheelchair users or the elderly. The owners of these buildings and houses may therefore be challenged by the need to find architects and renovators familiar with accessible design issues in order to make them accessible. There are however various Organizations and Companies that can assist with Universal Design and Access to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues. 

Organizations & Companies That Can Assist With Universal Design & Access

There are now various Organizations and Companies that specialize in Universal Design and Access and can advise you on how to adapt your building & environment to make sure that persons with disabilities have equal rights and no loss of dignity. The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD), QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting and Inclusive Design specialize in Universal Design and Access to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues. These Organizations and Companies can assist in different ways including:NCPD Logo

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD): believe that this can be prevented by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase and they therefor offer the following services to assist:

  • Workshops for architects, developers and other building professionals to develop an understanding of universal design and access.
  • Facilitating access audits for new or existing buildings; echo e-access for the natural and communication environment. Audits are followed by a report indicating shortfalls and recommendations.
  • Marketing of facilities that are accessible to persons with disabilities

Contact Fanie Swanepoel or Danie Marais for more information on Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or email them on: fanies@ncpd.org.za or danie@ncpd.org.za

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The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA): (QASA) is a non-profit organisation (NPO 000-881) of Quadriplegics and Paraplegics living in South Africa. QASA’s mission is to be an effective “co-ordinating, policy-making and supporting organisation striving to prevent spinal cord injury and to improve the lives of quadriplegics and paraplegics by securing resources to advocate, educate, capacitate, support and mobilise.”QuadPara Association of South Africa

QASA runs a number of Projects and Services and can assist with various issues relating to Universal Design & Access. The National Access Authority (NAA) provides a policing and advisory service for access issues and deals with access complaints and transgressions of the National Building Regulations. By promoting an accessible environment and taking to task, abuse of human rights, this project has ensured more accessible environments and promoted the concept of Universal design.

QASA is sustained by strategic relationships with corporates, social enterprise, the National Lottery Commission and a number of campaigns & events. Some of QASA’s projects generate revenue which services the essential non-revenue generating projects. Click on the link below to find out more about the Universal Design & Access services that they provide, or visit our Organizations - QASA Page to find out more about QASA & the other Projects & Services that they provide. You can also contact them through their website at www.qasa.co.za or read the article below to find out about Accessible Features & the other companies in South Africa that can assist you.

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Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting: Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting conducts Environmental Accessibility Audits designed to identify environmental barriers that could hinder access for Persons with a Disability. Our consultants will review your site, note potential barriers from a functional and safety perspective, and  propose cost-effective solutions which can be actioned within short, medium and longer term time frames. Our reports are practical in nature, specific in the solutions offered, and allow for ease of use by all. Relevant to all environments, from corporate offices, manufacturing or industry sites, education facilities or hospitality environments, we can assist.

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Inclusive Design: is a company founded on the fundamentals of the South African Constitution and aims to serve as a driver of social inclusion for positive and effective change in the lives of people with diverse human needs. Our philosophy is guided by individual and shared needs of people and not that of special needs. Universal Design serves as a means in which to create and enhance the functionality of environments, services and products, for the widest range of users, recognizing diversity of the human condition. Inclusive Design as a company, recognises the importance of awareness raising and the dissemination of information on diversity and inclusion as an integral deliverable to achieve Universal Access and improving lives.Inclusive Design

What we do:

Inclusive Design serves as a mechanism to audit, review, design, create and advise on adaptations and/or enhancements for the functionality of environments, transport, technology, education, services and operations, and products for all users, to accommodate the full spectrum of human diversity. Inclusive Design specialises in providing practical, sensible advice on issues relating to Universal Access and works on the premise that environments, services and facilities that are accessible to people with disabilities are equitable in the eyes of the law, makes business sense, as well as being easier and more comfortable for all users, irrespective of their functional requirements.

1.    BUSINESS CONCEPT:

Inclusive Design works with clients to find viable, feasible means of incorporating universal design into their environments, services, facilities and products. In a field of consulting where amateurs are rife and claim expertise, Inclusive Design has gone to great lengths to prove their competency on an international level. Headed by a consultant who is the highest certified Universal Access Consultant in South Africa, as verified by IAAP (International Association of Access Professionals) and with a plenary of examples and experience, Inclusive Design delivers, on time with exceptionally detailed results and recommendations. We put effort into making reports and findings legible, easy to understand and implementable to enable clients to positively affect change to becoming universally accessible and inclusive.

Services:

Inclusive Design

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Universal Access Consulting:

Consulting serves to advise clients on the options, requirements and areas where Universal Access can and should be achieved. With experience and knowledge of both South African building regulations for Persons with Disabilities, supporting equality legislation and international access requirements, Inclusive Design makes for the perfect collaborator to achieve Universal Access. Our consulting services serve to impart knowledge with clients on aspects, features and implementation of Universal Access to increase awareness of the requirements of people with disabilities as well as the broader range of beneficiaries including, pregnant women, people with young children, elderly people and people with temporary disabilities or recovering from surgery.

As part of our consulting services we also offer specific research, skills transfer and mentorship related to Universal Access and assist our clients wherever possible to progress towards a viable, feasible and desirable means of implementation to achieve equality. In line with the social model of disability, our emphasis has shifted away from the concept of being ‘disability’ focused, to that of being focused on ‘Universal Access’, which acknowledges that the benefit thereof goes beyond the classification of people with disabilities. Universal Access Consulting can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)
  • systems, services and operations
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and systems
  • Policy development, reviews and updates

Universal Access Auditing:

Universal Access Consulting

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Auditing is the examination or inspection of various aspects of the environment, service, facility or product to determine compliance with local and/or international requirements. Audits are conducted through physical inspection and are followed by reports to indicate short-falls, areas of improvement and areas of non-compliance. Universal Access Auditing is largely conducted in the built environment in South Africa, where SANS 10400 Part S (2011): Facilities for Persons with Disabilities is the deem to satisfy requirement, which is supplemented with ISO21542 in areas where more details are required or environments which are more specialised. This process is detailed, and the audit is conducted meticulously and often includes discussions with users of the facility regarding usability, which leads to a custom report with bespoke recommendations for both built infrastructure and operations.

Inclusive Design also offers companies an advantage through a proprietary Universal Access Application™ which enables large areas of the built environment to be audited in a systematic, accurate, thorough and detailed process (for example: a campus). Saving clients time and money as the UA App captures vast amounts of data, with measurements, photo evidence and SANS 10400 Part S (2011) compliance in an easy to read, tabulated format, in a matter of days. This process conventionally takes a vast number of human hours to capture, process and write-up by a highly experience UA Auditor, but with the Universal Access App™ it is simplified, quickened, accurate and unbiased. 

Universal Access Auditing can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)- with the UA App™
  • systems, services and operation
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and system
  • policy and implementation plans

Universal Access Awareness:

Universal Access Audits & Reviews

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

The Great Father of our Nation, Nelson Mandela said that “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” It is our belief, at Inclusive Design, that by teaching principles of good design, that we can make a significant impact upon our society. It is therefore always a recommended deliverable in our work to transfer skills and educate others on Universal Design and Universal Access. The capacitation of more people with the knowledge and understanding of the value that inclusive design offers to staff, clients and society, is part of our vision and what we strive to achieve. What we term Universal Access Awareness, can be customised to the clients’ needs, and can vary from an introductory presentation to an in-depth training session on specific aspects. Universal Access cannot be achieved without at least the basic understanding of the paradigm that leads to equality.

Additional Services:

  • Disability Awareness Training (also known as Disability Awareness Training or Sensitisation)
  • Disability Specific Monitoring and Evaluation (Qualified M and E services)

Business Competitiveness:

Universal Access is a broad concept that requires understanding, application, implementation, experience and governance around various sectors, such as the built environment, services, facilities, transport, technology, regulations and more. Inclusive Design has explicit experience in Policy, Guideline and Framework writing and advising, Technical Requirement writing, Implementation Plans, Onsite Auditing, Plan Drawing Auditing, Architectural and Planning Consulting, Auditing and Consulting in the realms of Transport, Marketing and Communication, and Training. Inclusive Design is not focused on a specific area of disability, and therefore offer holistic recommendations in order to accommodate a spectrum of users, irrespective of their abilities. Inclusive Design practice good business principles, deliver on time, communicate directly with clients, and offer superior project deliverables.

If there are any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at Inclusive Design on Tel: +27 72 027 3623 or Email: colette@inclusivedesign.co.za Cape Town (HQ) ● Pretoria (Administration), or visit our website at: www.inclusivedesign.co.za

These Organizations and Companies listed above which specialize in Universal Design and Access will follow those standards set by  "The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act" to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues.

The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act

Some laws regarding Persons with disabilities, which are stated in "The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act" include:

  1. Persons with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets. (Disabled Toilets)
  2. There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.
  3. There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.
  4. Lifts in buildings must be able to serve the needs of disabled people. This includes ensuring that any commonly used “path of travel” MUST be free of any sort of obstacles that would limit, restrict or endanger people with disabilities who use that route. There must also be absolutely no obstacles that will prevent people with disabilities from accessing facilities within the building. The regulations refer specifically to people with impaired vision, but clearly they also relate to people in wheelchairs, or people who have trouble walking freely.
  5. Buildings that incorporate halls or auditoriums for public use are obliged to ensure that a reasonable percentage of space is available for people in wheelchairs or other “assistive devices”. (Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts)
  6. The National Building Regulations also state that where there is parking available for more than 50 motor vehicles, there must  be parking facilities that accommodate disabled persons. There is also an obligation to ensure that persons with disabilities are provided with a suitable means of access from the parking area to the ground floor – or storey – of the building. (Disabled Parking Bays)

Signagedisabled parking sign

The International Symbol of Access (ISA), also known as the (International) Wheelchair Symbol, consists of a blue square overlaid in white with a stylized image of a wheelchair. It is maintained as an international standard, ISO 7001 image of the International Commission on Technology and Accessibility (ICTA)

The symbol is often seen where access has been improved, particularly for wheelchair users, but also for other disability issues. Frequently, the symbol shows the removal of environmental barriers, such as steps, to help the disabled, elderly, parents with baby carriages, and travellers. Universal design aims to obviate such symbols by creating products and facilities that are accessible to nearly all users from the start. The wheelchair symbol is "International" and therefore not accompanied by Braille in any particular language.

Specific uses of the ISA include:

  • Marking a parking space reserved for vehicles used by people with disabilities/blue badge holders
  • Marking a vehicle used by a person with a disability, often for permission to use a space
  • Marking a public lavatory with facilities designed for wheelchair users
  • Indicating a button to activate an automatic door
  • Indicating an accessible transit station or vehicle
  • Indicating a transit route that uses accessible vehicles

Providing clear and visible marking by using this accessible disabled sign is essential in making facilities visible for those who need them. The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations therefore makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes regulations on Signage.

Facilities that are included in a building specifically for use by persons with disabilities, such as wheelchair-accessible parking spaces, wheelchair-accessible toilets, and platform or stair lifts, shall be indicated by the international symbol for access.

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Disabled Toiletsdisabled toilets

An accessible toilet is a special toilet designed to accommodate people with physical disabilities. They are sometimes known as Disabled Toilets.

Public toilets can present accessibility challenges for people with disabilities, such as those people in wheelchairs. Stalls may not be able to fit a wheelchair, and transferring between the wheelchair and the toilet seat may pose a challenge. Accessible toilets are designed to address these issues by providing more space and bars for users to grab and hold during transfers.

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain amount of Disabled Toilets.

In any building where facilities for persons with disabilities are required in terms of Regulation S1 (see annex A), there shall be one or more toilets or unisex toilet facilities suitable for use by wheelchair users.

People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets.

These Disabled Toilets:

  • follow certain regulations
  • Need larger floor space than other cubicles to allow space for a wheelchair to maneuver. This space is also useful for people who are not necessarily wheelchair users, but still need physical support from someone else.
  • Have a wheelchair-height changing table is also recommended, but remains rarely available. Accessible changing tables are low and accessible to a wheelchair user, and long enough for a caretaker to change an older child or adult with a disability.
  • Have a wheelchair-height toilet, to help the user on and off the toilet, with handles (grab bars)
  • Have an emergency alarm, in the form of a red cord that reaches the ground, connected to a buzzer and a flashing red light
  • Have a wheelchair-height sink and hand dryer.
  • Have wheelchair-width doors leading to it, allowing sufficient space for a wheelchair when a door is open.

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Ramps

A wheelchair ramp is an inclined plane installed in addition to or instead of stairs. Ramps permit wheelchair users, as well as people pushing strollers, carts, or other wheeled objects, to more easily access a building.

A wheelchair ramp can be permanent, semi-permanent or portable. Permanent ramps are designed to be bolted or otherwise attached in place. Semi-permanent ramps rest on top of the ground or concrete pad and are commonly used for the short term. Permanent and semi-permanent ramps are usually of aluminum, concrete or wood.ramps

Ramps must be carefully designed in order to be useful. Many jurisdictions have established minimum widths and maximum slopes. A less steep rise can be easier for a wheelchair user to navigate, as well as safer in wet or icy conditions.

The South African National Standard for Building Regulations state that Wheelchair ramps (or other ways for wheelchair users to access a building, such as a wheelchair lift) are required in new construction for public accommodations in South Africa. They also state that these wheelchair Lifts & Ramps must meet certain regulations & requirements.

People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets. (Disabled Toilets)

There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

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Disabled Parking Bays & Disabled Parking Discs

One of the many "Accessible Features" that the government has introduced, is "Wheelchair Parking." The Government has introduced certain regulation that state, how many of these "Wheelchair Parking Bays" must be available & the size of the "Wheelchair Parking Bays"

The National Building Regulations state that where there is parking available for more than 50 motor vehicles, there must  be parking facilities that accommodate disabled persons. There is also an obligation to ensure that persons with disabilities are provided with a suitable means of access from the parking area to the ground floor – or storey – of the building.

These parking bays are not only close to the entrance, but are also wider than the disabled parking placeaverage parking bay. Wheelchair parking bays are traditionally 3500mm wide to cater for a wheelchair user who needs the extra space to enter or exit the vehicle, thus enabling:

  • a wheelchair user to transfer into their wheelchair from their car.
  • It enables the helper of a severely disabled person to park the wheelchair next to the car so that they can lift the person from the car and place him into the wheelchair.
  • It also enables the helper of a severely disabled person to offload a person from a kombi in a wheelchair down ramps or with a wheelchair lift.

By having this extra space helps these transfers to be done safely for the wheelchair user & helps prevent the vehicle in the parking space next door from getting damaged.

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Accessible Routes & Doorways

An important part of accessibility is not only accessible parking spaces, passenger loading zones, ramps, Disabled Toilets & Lifts, etc but also insuring that there are various accessible routes from the public streets onto the pavements & to the accessible building entrance and to the facilities inside the building & visa versa. Appropriate accessible routes should also be made available for emergency exits. Accessible Routes include:

  • Ramps on & off the pavement
  • Wide enough walkways for a variety of size wheelchairs
  • No obstacles on these pathways
  • Wide doorways & turning areas, etc.

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations passes  laws that insure that new buildings & structures are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes regulations on Accessible Routes.

There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

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Lifts

Thanks partly to the disability rights movement we have seen an improvement in building accessibility. With the installation of elevators or lifts buildings are now accessible even for those in a wheelchairs.

A lift (or elevator) is a form of vertical transportation between building floors, levels or decks, commonly used in offices, public buildings and other types of multi-storey accommodation. Lifts can be essential for providing vertical circulation, particularly in tall buildings, for wheelchair and other non-ambulant building users and for the vertical transportation of goods. Some lifts may also be used for firefighting and evacuation purposes.

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations therefore makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes Lifts & the regulations set aside for these Lifts.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

Lifts in buildings must be able to serve the needs of disabled people. This includes ensuring that any commonly used “path of travel” MUST be free of any sort of obstacles that would limit, restrict or endanger people with disabilities who use that route. There must also be absolutely no obstacles that will prevent people with disabilities from accessing facilities within the building. The regulations refer specifically to people with impaired vision, but clearly they also relate to people in wheelchairs, or people who have trouble walking freely.

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Disabled Seating In Auditoriums, Grandstands & Halls

In South Africa & around the world buildings such as Auditoriums, grandstands, halls & sports stadiums are made wheelchair friendly by adding among other things, wheelchair platforms, so that wheelchair users can enjoy the event from their wheelchairs & also have a clear view of the stage, field, screen, etc.sports stands

Buildings where these "platforms" are build include:

  • Movie Theaters
  • Sports Stadiums
  • Music Concerts, etc

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations  makes laws that insure that these type of buildings are designed & build with these wheelchair bays/platforms & that they meet certain regulations.

Buildings that incorporate halls or auditoriums for public use are obliged to ensure that a reasonable percentage of space is available for people in wheelchairs or other “Assistive Devices”. (Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts)

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Links

To find Companies and Organizations that can assist you, visit our "Services & Service Providers" Search Facility on the following link: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/services/. If you require any Products listed on this page, visit our "Products" search facility: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/products-equipment/

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

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The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA)
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Inclusive Design

Accessible Features

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Accessible Features

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Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

There are a lot of incredible initiatives out there that are improving the lives of persons with Visual Impairments by providing them with assistance to be able to complete day to day activities, including traveling and being able to live independently. Government Regulations have been put in place in South Africa and around the world to try to make public places more accessible to persons with disabilities, including persons with Visual Impairments. The Government makes laws that insure that new buildings and surrounding areas are designed & built with certain features such as Tactile Paving, to make pavements and buildings more accessible, these are known as The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act, which was amended and published by the Department of Trade and Industry in May 2008.

These "initiatives" and the "Government Regulations" which have been introduced, are collectively known on this website as "Accessible Features" and are there to ensure that buildings, accommodation and transport is accessible and that equal opportunities and rights are available for persons with disabilities. In the article below, we will discuss the Accessible Features which have been introduced in South Africa to assist persons with Visual Impairments to gain independence, as well as the companies and organizations that are available to assist them.

Initiatives Introduced To Assist In Day To Day Activities

There are a wide variety of initiatives and laws which have been introduced through out the world and in South Africa to assist persons with Visually Impairments to live and travel independently and to be able to complete daily tasks and activities, such as Traveling, Shopping, Eating Out and Moving From Point A To Point B. These initiatives help to ensure that equal opportunities and rights are available to persons with Visual Impairments, they include:

  • Money - Distinct Shapes & Raised Patterns On Our Coins & Notes
  • Service Dogs and Guide Dogs - Rules & Regulations (allowing them in restaurants, public transportation, aeroplanes, etc.)
  • The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines
  • Braille Atlas
  • Audible Traffic Lights.
  • Tactile Paving
  • Building Regulations that assist the Blind

Please read the article below to find out more about these initiatives and how they can assist the Blind and persons with Visually Impairments.

Money - Distinct Shapes & Raised Patterns On Our Coins & Notes

In South Africa and in many other countries around the world, both Coins and Bank Notes have been designed and made to include distinct features soBank Notes that Persons who are Blind are able to tell the different coins and notes apart. The South African National Council for the Blind was fully consulted by the South African Reserve Bank in the process for creating the new Mandela Series bank notes to ensure that the notes were made to be accessible to persons with Visual Impairments. A team from the Reserve Bank also held a workshop to ensure that all sectors of the visually impaired community received training and information regarding the new notes. The new notes are the same size and colouring as the old notes (just brighter) , so the Money Sticks which are used by some persons with Visual Impairments, will still work accurately.

Bank Notes

The South African Bank Notes are different lengths and have: one, two, three, four or five raised diamond shapes in the middle of the bottom half of the notes to enable blind people to identify them as R10, R20, R50, R100 and R200 respectively. For the benefit of the partially sighted, the Reserve Bank has also introduced geometric shapes on the front of the banknotes. The R10 note features a diamond, the R20 a square, the R50.00 a circle, the R100.00 a 'flat' hexagon and the R200.00 a 'honey comb' hexagon.

For quick and easy reference money templates are also used to measure banknotes, these money templates come in various styles, including an aluminium device and a cardboard one, which can also be used to store the banknotes. Money templates are available to purchase from organizations such as the Guide Dogs Association of South African, Blind SA, or the South African National Council for the Blind. Contact them to receive a quote, or visit Blind SA to see how to use the Cardboard Template.

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CoinsCoins - distinct features

A coin for example has six distinct features by which it can be identified. These include the: size; thickness; shape, as they are not all are entirely round; pattern of grooves round the edge; the sound it makes when dropped onto a table and the raised picture on the face.

We have 9 coins in South Africa:

  1. The 1; 2; 5 and 10 Cents are almost never used now.
  2. The 20 cent  and 50 cents are all identifiable by continuous  serration on the edges. These are called “copper”  coins and have a different feel from the “silver rand value coins.
  3. There are two types of 5 Rand coins, the latest and preferable one is unique in that it is thicker and has an interesting edging which includes complete serration as well as a groove running around it; it feels like two coins joined together.
  4. The 1 Rand, 2 Rand and the old 5 Rand coins are distinguishable from Cent coins in that  their serration around the edge is broken by smooth edging as well.

Size  is also important:

  • The 10 Cent and 1 Cent are the smallest while the 5 Rand coin is the largest
  • The 50 cent coin is slightly larger than the 1 Rand but can easily be told apart by the difference in serration, which has been mentioned above.

Equipment is also available to help persons who are Blind to store their coins and distinguish between them, this equipment includes:Coin Selector

Plastic Coin Selectors: are also used for quick and easy reference, as the plastic unit has places for South African coins which enables you to handily store your coins in one unit. These plastic coin selectors are available from organizations such as South African National Council for the Blind. You can contact them to find out more or to receive a quote.

Service Dogs and Guide Dogs - Rules & Regulations

Guide Dogs and Service Animals are trained to assist persons who are Blind or Visually Impaired to get from point A to point B  faster and safer. Service animals are defined as animals that are individually trained to do work or perform tasks for persons with disabilities, they are working animals and not pets, so the work orGuide Dogs task that the animal has been trained to provide must be directly related to the person's disability. In several countries, including South Africa, Service Dogs and Guide Dogs are exempt from regulations against the presence of animals in places such as restaurants, public transportation and aeroplanes. To find out more about Guide Dogs and the Organizations that train and provide them, as well as these rules and regulations, click on the link below.

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The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

The internet and Websites can be very valuable, when websites and web tools are properly designed and coded, people with disabilities can use them, but currently many sites and tools are developed with accessibility barriers that make them difficult or impossible for some people to use, especially persons with disabilities. Making the web accessible benefits individuals, businesses, and society. International web standards define what is needed for accessibility.

The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, often abbreviated to WCAG, are a series of guidelines for improving web accessibility. Produced by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the WCAG are the best means of making your website useful to all of your users. The World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) develops international Web standards: HTML, CSS, and many more. W3C’s Web standards are called W3C Recommendations. All W3C standards are reviewed for accessibility support by the Accessible Platform Architectures (APA) Working Group. The W3C standards and Working Group Notes introduced below are particularly relevant to accessibility.

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Braille Atlas

The Department of Land Affairs has achieved yet another milestone in advancing the implementation of its disability strategy by producing the first ever Braille atlas of maps covering South Africa. The decision to produce the SA Braille Atlas was taken in terms of the departmental disability strategy and the constitutional right of access to information by disabled persons. The Pioneer School for the Blind and the Pioneer Printing Works in Worcester played a key role in assisting the cartographers of CDSM during the preliminary stages of the atlas production. Many issues arose concerning the size and format of tactile maps and how the blind user is able to assimilate information. During the initial stages, interviews and workshops were held with pupils and teachers at the Pioneer School for the Blind and based on recommendations from them, it was decided to produce an atlas rather than a single map. The blind user relies on variances in the texture of the tactile image. This atlas is primarily intended as an educational tool for blind persons who can read Braille. In terms of the Constitution and the right of access to information by people with disabilities, this publication will enable the blind in South Africa to be in touch with the world€.

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Audible Traffic Signals

Audible traffic signals exist in some countries overseas and also in South Africa in various cities including Johannesburg and Cape Town. The device, known as the "Audio Tactile Pedestrian Detector", had its origins in Australia where it has been used for more than 20 years to assist those who cannot see the green pedestrian crossing symbol at traffic lights. The device transmits an audible signal and will also vibrate when the pedestrian green man traffic light symbol is switched on. There is an arrow that shows the direction to cross and then there is both the vibration and the sound. The device is able to measure Ambient Noise and increase its own buzzer level always to be above the surrounding noise that might be a distraction.

The system has two components, a post- mounted weather proof box, and the audio tactile button assembly. The push button assembly accommodates the tactile transducer fitted to the front plate and also houses the audio signal transmitter. The newly installed traffic signal system provides sound alerts, push buttons and LED lane lights at the intersection, that are able to ensure that visually impaired pedestrians crossing the road are well assisted by the new technology.

The traffic lights are designed with sound and touch push buttons which communicate reliable information to visually impaired pedestrians to enhance their safety whilst crossing the street. The audible push button gives a loud signal alerting the visually impaired when it is green for them to cross, and when it is no longer safe to enter the intersection.

Lane lights, built into the road surface, serve as an additional warning to motorists that the traffic light is red and that they need to stop. These lane lights for the pedestrian crossing are highly visible as brightness is automatically adjusted to light intensity.

Unfortunately these Audible traffic signals are not currently available throughout South Africa and the current Standard traffic lights do not cater for the visually impaired, but this new innovation will improve lives, as the blind will be able to press the button on the traffic lights and hear when it is safe to cross the road on their own, so it is hoped that this innovation will catch on through the rest of South Africa.

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Tactile Paving

Tactile Paving is used in many cities around the world, including cities in and around South Africa. Tactile Paving (also called truncated domes) is a system of textured ground surface indicators found on footpaths, pavements, stairs and train stationTactile Paving platforms to assist pedestrians who are blind or visually impaired to navigate cities and be more independent and mobile. Tactile paving units are like braille for pavements and was originally instituted at pedestrian crossings and other hazardous road situations by Japan, the United Kingdom, Australia and then United States in the early 1990s. Tactile Paving can now be found in many countries around the world and in most cities in South Africa, the paving is also available to purchase from various companies in South Africa.

These Tactile Pavings provide a distinctive surface pattern of truncated domes, cones or bars which are detectable by a long cane or underfoot, they are used to alert persons with Visually Impairments of approaching streets and a hazardous surface or grade changes. These raised bumps and ridges help guide people down sidewalks and across intersections, the raised ridges denote pathways (longer stretches between stops and changes), while raised domes are used to indicate a stop or change (e.g. the presence of an intersection or edge or a shift in direction).

In South Africa the use of Tactile Paving is recommended and specified in "The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act" below:

4.4.3 Obstructions in the path of travel NOTE 2: The recommended surface between a pavement and roadway is a ramp fitted with tactile guidance surface indicators. This provides a safe and trafficable surface for wheelchair users, and a detectable surface to indicate to persons with visual impairments that they are leaving a pedestrian footpath and entering a traffic roadway.

In many cases Tactile Pavings work well and are very important tools to assist the Blind and persons with Visual Impairments, it is however very important that strict guidelines are met when installing this paving: Tactile Guidance on the use of Tactile Paving Surfaces but in some places where Tactile Pavings are not laid out correctly, they no longer provide assistance but instead become very hazardous.

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Building Regulations

To View full List of Building Regulations, Click Here: Regulations for facilities for Disabled Pdf.

Effective civil rights legislation is sought in order to secure the rights & access to public areas such as city streets and public buildings and restrooms. Some parts of the Act Part S deals with facilities for persons with disabilities, including the Blind, which has directly affected the building industry. Building Regulations are part of the Accessible Features which have been introduced by mostly the Government, to make public buildings more accessible to people with disabilities, including the Blind. These Regulations include public areas such as city streets, public buildings, shops and restrooms.

Unfortunately many persons with disabilities including the Blind, are often still excluded from many events, services, information, communication, products and venues, because during the planning phases, all users were not considered. There are however various Organizations and Companies that can assist.

Organizations & Companies That Can Assist With Universal Design & Access

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD), QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting and Inclusive Design specialize in Universal Design and Access to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues. These Organizations and Companies thatNCPD Logo can assist in different ways including:

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD): believe that this can be prevented by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase and they therefor offer the following services to assist:

  • Workshops for architects, developers and other building professionals to develop an understanding of universal design and access.
  • Facilitating access audits for new or existing buildings; echo e-access for the natural and communication environment. Audits are followed by a report indicating shortfalls and recommendations.
  • Marketing of facilities that are accessible to persons with disabilities

Contact Fanie Swanepoel or Danie Marais for more information on Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or email them on: fanies@ncpd.org.za or danie@ncpd.org.za

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The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA): Can assist with various issues relating to Universal Design & Access. The National Access Authority (NAA) provides a policing and advisory service for access issues and deals with access complaints and transgressions of the National Building Regulations. By promoting an accessible environment and taking to task, abuse ofQuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) human rights, this project has ensured more accessible environments and promoted the concept of Universal design.

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Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting: Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting conducts Environmental Accessibility Audits designed to identify environmental barriers that could hinder access for Persons with a Disability. Our consultants will review your site, note potential barriers from a functional and safety perspective, and  propose cost-effective solutions which can be actioned within short, medium and longer term time frames. Our reports are practical in nature, specific in the solutions offered, and allow forBradshaw LeRoux ease of use by all. Relevant to all environments, from corporate offices, manufacturing or industry sites, education facilities or hospitality environments, we can assist.

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Inclusive Design: is a company founded on the fundamentals of the South African Constitution and aims to serve as a driver of social inclusion for positive and effective change in the lives of people with diverse human needs. Our philosophy is guided by individual and shared needs of people and not that of special needs. Universal Design serves as a means in which to create and enhance the functionality of environments, services and products, for the widest range of users, recognizing diversity of the human condition. Inclusive Design as a company, recognises the importance of awareness raising and the dissemination of information on diversity and inclusion as an integral deliverable to achieve Universal Access and improving lives.Inclusive Design

What we do:

Inclusive Design serves as a mechanism to audit, review, design, create and advise on adaptations and/or enhancements for the functionality of environments, transport, technology, education, services and operations, and products for all users, to accommodate the full spectrum of human diversity. Inclusive Design specialises in providing practical, sensible advice on issues relating to Universal Access and works on the premise that environments, services and facilities that are accessible to people with disabilities are equitable in the eyes of the law, makes business sense, as well as being easier and more comfortable for all users, irrespective of their functional requirements.

1.    BUSINESS CONCEPT:

Inclusive Design works with clients to find viable, feasible means of incorporating universal design into their environments, services, facilities and products. In a field of consulting where amateurs are rife and claim expertise, Inclusive Design has gone to great lengths to prove their competency on an international level. Headed by a consultant who is the highest certified Universal Access Consultant in South Africa, as verified by IAAP (International Association of Access Professionals) and with a plenary of examples and experience, Inclusive Design delivers, on time with exceptionally detailed results and recommendations. We put effort into making reports and findings legible, easy to understand and implementable to enable clients to positively affect change to becoming universally accessible and inclusive.

Services:

Inclusive Design

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Universal Access Consulting:

Consulting serves to advise clients on the options, requirements and areas where Universal Access can and should be achieved. With experience and knowledge of both South African building regulations for Persons with Disabilities, supporting equality legislation and international access requirements, Inclusive Design makes for the perfect collaborator to achieve Universal Access. Our consulting services serve to impart knowledge with clients on aspects, features and implementation of Universal Access to increase awareness of the requirements of people with disabilities as well as the broader range of beneficiaries including, pregnant women, people with young children, elderly people and people with temporary disabilities or recovering from surgery.

As part of our consulting services we also offer specific research, skills transfer and mentorship related to Universal Access and assist our clients wherever possible to progress towards a viable, feasible and desirable means of implementation to achieve equality. In line with the social model of disability, our emphasis has shifted away from the concept of being ‘disability’ focused, to that of being focused on ‘Universal Access’, which acknowledges that the benefit thereof goes beyond the classification of people with disabilities. Universal Access Consulting can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)
  • systems, services and operations
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and systems
  • Policy development, reviews and updates

Universal Access Auditing:

Universal Access Consulting

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Auditing is the examination or inspection of various aspects of the environment, service, facility or product to determine compliance with local and/or international requirements. Audits are conducted through physical inspection and are followed by reports to indicate short-falls, areas of improvement and areas of non-compliance. Universal Access Auditing is largely conducted in the built environment in South Africa, where SANS 10400 Part S (2011): Facilities for Persons with Disabilities is the deem to satisfy requirement, which is supplemented with ISO21542 in areas where more details are required or environments which are more specialised. This process is detailed, and the audit is conducted meticulously and often includes discussions with users of the facility regarding usability, which leads to a custom report with bespoke recommendations for both built infrastructure and operations.

Inclusive Design also offers companies an advantage through a proprietary Universal Access Application™ which enables large areas of the built environment to be audited in a systematic, accurate, thorough and detailed process (for example: a campus). Saving clients time and money as the UA App captures vast amounts of data, with measurements, photo evidence and SANS 10400 Part S (2011) compliance in an easy to read, tabulated format, in a matter of days. This process conventionally takes a vast number of human hours to capture, process and write-up by a highly experience UA Auditor, but with the Universal Access App™ it is simplified, quickened, accurate and unbiased. 

Universal Access Auditing can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)- with the UA App™
  • systems, services and operation
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and system
  • policy and implementation plans

Universal Access Awareness:

Universal Access Audits & Reviews

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

The Great Father of our Nation, Nelson Mandela said that “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” It is our belief, at Inclusive Design, that by teaching principles of good design, that we can make a significant impact upon our society. It is therefore always a recommended deliverable in our work to transfer skills and educate others on Universal Design and Universal Access. The capacitation of more people with the knowledge and understanding of the value that inclusive design offers to staff, clients and society, is part of our vision and what we strive to achieve. What we term Universal Access Awareness, can be customised to the clients’ needs, and can vary from an introductory presentation to an in-depth training session on specific aspects. Universal Access cannot be achieved without at least the basic understanding of the paradigm that leads to equality.

Additional Services:

  • Disability Awareness Training (also known as Disability Awareness Training or Sensitisation)
  • Disability Specific Monitoring and Evaluation (Qualified M and E services)

Business Competitiveness:

Universal Access is a broad concept that requires understanding, application, implementation, experience and governance around various sectors, such as the built environment, services, facilities, transport, technology, regulations and more. Inclusive Design has explicit experience in Policy, Guideline and Framework writing and advising, Technical Requirement writing, Implementation Plans, Onsite Auditing, Plan Drawing Auditing, Architectural and Planning Consulting, Auditing and Consulting in the realms of Transport, Marketing and Communication, and Training. Inclusive Design is not focused on a specific area of disability, and therefore offer holistic recommendations in order to accommodate a spectrum of users, irrespective of their abilities. Inclusive Design practice good business principles, deliver on time, communicate directly with clients, and offer superior project deliverables.

If there are any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at Inclusive Design on Tel: +27 72 027 3623 or Email: colette@inclusivedesign.co.za Cape Town (HQ) ● Pretoria (Administration), or visit our website at: www.inclusivedesign.co.za

These Organizations and Companies listed above which specialize in Universal Design and Access will follow those standards set by "The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act" below to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues.

The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act

  1. People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets. (Disabled Toilets)
  2. There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.
  3. There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.
  4. Lifts in buildings must be able to serve the needs of disabled people. This includes ensuring that any commonly used “path of travel” MUST be free of any sort of obstacles that would limit, restrict or endanger people with disabilities who use that route. There must also be absolutely no obstacles that will prevent people with disabilities from accessing facilities within the building. The regulations refer specifically to people with impaired vision, but clearly they also relate to people in wheelchairs, or people who have trouble walking freely.
  5. Buildings that incorporate halls or auditoriums for public use are obliged to ensure that a reasonable percentage of space is available for people in wheelchairs or other “assistive devices”. (Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts)
  6. The National Building Regulations also state that where there is parking available for more than 50 motor vehicles, there must  be parking facilities that accommodate disabled persons. There is also an obligation to ensure that persons with disabilities are provided with a suitable means of access from the parking area to the ground floor – or storey – of the building. (Disabled Parking Bays)

Below are those regulations that are there to help the Blind or Visually Impaired.

Signage

The International Symbol of Access (ISA), also known as the (International) Wheelchair Symbol, consists of a blue square overlaid in white with a stylized image of a wheelchair. It is maintained as an international standard, ISO 7001 image of the International Commission on Technology and Accessibility (ICTA)

The symbol is often seen where access has been improved, particularly for wheelchair users, but also for other disability issues including for persons with Visual Impairment. Frequently, the symbol shows the removal of environmental barriers, such as steps, to help the disabled, elderly, parents with baby carriages, and travellers. Universal design aims to obviate such symbols by creating products and facilities that are accessible to nearly all users from the start. The wheelchair symbol is "International" and therefore not accompanied by Braille in any particular language.

Specific uses of the ISA include:

  • Marking a parking space reserved for vehicles used by people with disabilities/blue badge holders
  • Marking a vehicle used by a person with a disability, often for permission to use a space
  • Marking a public lavatory with facilities designed for wheelchair users
  • Indicating a button to activate an automatic door
  • Indicating an accessible transit station or vehicle
  • Indicating a transit route that uses accessible vehicles

4.2 Signage Regulations

Providing clear and visible marking by using this accessible disabled sign is essential in making facilities visible for those who need them. The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations therefore makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes regulations on Signage.

4.2.1 Facilities that are included in a building specifically for use by persons with disabilities, such as wheelchair-accessible parking spaces, wheelchair-accessible toilets, and platform or stair lifts, shall be indicated by the international symbol for access (see figure 1) and shall comply with 4.2.2 and 4.2.4. The international symbol shall be exhibited at the main entrance of, and at any other suitable position in, a building, and in suitable positions to indicate to persons with disabilities the route to the exit of such facilities.

4.2.2 The sign used to indicate facilities provided for persons with disabilities shall be the SANS 1186-1 type designation GA 22 (allocated to or accessible to wheelchairs) sign. Such signage shall comply with the requirements of SANS 1186-1 and shall have a symbol height of not less than 110 mm.

4.2.3 Facilities that are not in accordance with the requirements of this part of SANS 10400 shall not bear the international symbol.

NOTE 1: The symbol is the property of the International Standards Office and its use can only be sanctioned where the minimum requirements of the National Building Regulations have been complied with.

NOTE 2: Signs should be in clear, visible and tactile format to ensure that persons with visual impairments are also fully informed. In buildings where persons with visual impairments work or live, evacuation instructions in large print and Braille should be provided, so that persons with visual impairments can familiarize themselves with escape routes.

4.2.4 Clear legible signs shall indicate the direction and name of an accessible facility and shall incorporate the international symbol. The height of the lettering shall not be less than 50 mm.

Where the viewing distance is greater than 10 m, the height of the lettering shall be increased accordingly (see table 1).

Table 1 — Height of lettering in relation to viewing distance

Viewing distance meters Height mm
25  80
30  100
40  140
 50  160

To enable persons with impaired vision to read location signs adjacent to doors or directional signs on walls, the signs should be placed at a height of between 1,4 m and 1,7 m above finished floor level.

NOTE: Raised letters and symbols, in contrasting light and dark colours, on identification or location signs assist those who are blind or have impaired vision.

All internal signage to indicate escape routes in case of total blackout shall comply with the requirements of SANS 10400-T.

4.2.5 For demarcating parking areas for wheelchair users, signs should be not less than 2,0 m vertically above driveway level, so that the sign can be seen whilst driving a car.

4.2.6 Where electronic aids are installed to assist persons with hearing loss, a suitable sign shall be displayed to indicate such facilities.

4.2.7 Any mark or sign shall comply with the relevant requirements of SANS 1186-1.

Disabled Toilets

An accessible toilet is a special toilet designed to accommodate people with physical disabilities. They are sometimes known as Disabled Toilets, but do not give much assistance to the Blind & Visually Impaired. Click on the following link "Disabled Toilets" to find out more.

Ramps

A wheelchair ramp is an inclined plane installed in addition to or instead of stairs. Ramps permit wheelchair users, as well as people pushing strollers, carts, or other wheeled objects, to more easily access a building. They can also be useful for the Visually Impaired & Blind to easier navigate an incline.

A wheelchair ramp can be permanent, semi-permanent or portable. Permanent ramps are designed to be bolted or otherwise attached in place. Semi-permanent ramps rest on top of the ground or concrete pad and are commonly used for the short term. Permanent and semi-permanent ramps are usually of aluminum, concrete or wood.

Ramps must be carefully designed in order to be useful. Many jurisdictions have established minimum widths and maximum slopes. A less steep rise can be easier for a wheelchair user to navigate, as well as safer in wet or icy conditions.

The South African National Standard for Building Regulations state that Wheelchair ramps or a lift) are required in new construction for public accommodations in South Africa. They also state that these wheelchair Lifts & Ramps must meet certain regulations & requirements.

People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it.

Access for people with disabilities must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor. There must also be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. In addition, a further clause states that departure routes must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

Ramp Design Regulations

NOTE 1: Ramps might be required for use by persons without disabilities, for example, persons pushing trolleys who require ramps as an alternative to stepped access.

NOTE 2: Ramps should only be provided where level access cannot be achieved. Where a ramp is provided, stepped access should normally accompany it for persons with ambulant disabilities who find ramps difficult to use.

4.8.1 Any ramp or series of ramps shall provide a safe, comfortable and convenient route for wheelchair users.

4.8.2 Any ramp provided in terms of this part of SANS 10400 shall

  1. have a gradient, measured along the centre line, that is not steeper than 1:12 ;
  2. have a clear, trafficable surface not less than 1 100 m wide;
  3. have a surface in accordance with 4.5;
  4. have a landing at the top and bottom of each ramp of not less than 1,2 m in length (clear of any door swing) and of width not less than that of the ramp;
  5. comply with the requirements between landings as given in table 2 and figure 11;
  6. have a handrail on both sides of the ramp or, where the width is greater than 2,4 m, a central handrail in accordance with the requirements of 4.10 where the gradient is steeper than 1:15;
  7. where ramps in the same direction are used for a vertical rise of more than 600 mm, be staggered by the width of the ramp, in order to prevent a long straight line of ramps (see also 4.8.2(d)).

NOTE: Where the total rise contemplated for a series of ramps is greater than 2 m, consideration should be given to alternative means of vertical circulation.

Table 2 — Ramp requirements between landings

1 2 3
Gradient Maximum vertical rise mm Maximum ramp length between landings meters
 1 : 12  500  6
 1 : 15  665  10
 1 : 20  750  15

4.8.3 No door leaf or window shall open onto a ramp or landing (see also 4.8.2(d)).

4.8.4 The camber or banking on walkways and ramps shall not exceed 1:50, as shown in figure 4.

4.8.5 At any point where the clear height of the area below the soffit is less than 2,1 m, and it is not enclosed, the means of limiting inadvertent access to such area shall be indicated.

4.9 Stairways

4.9.1 Stairways shall comply with the requirements of SANS 10400-M, SANS 10400-T and the following requirements:

  1. the width of any stairway, measured to an enclosing wall or balustrade, shall be at least 900 mm;
  2. a landing that serves two flights of stairs in the same straight line shall be of length at least 1 100 mm;
  3. the rise of each tread step shall be of the same height and shall not exceed 170 mm;
  4. solid risers shall be provided in all accessible routes;
  5. a stairway shall be provided with handrails on both sides of the stairway in accordance with the requirements of 4.10;
  6. The maximum height allowed in a flight of stairs, between landings, shall not exceed 1,530 m;
  7. The stairway shall not include any winders (as defined in SANS 10400-M);
  8. No spiral stairway shall form part of an accessible route.

4.9.2 Nosings shall effectively contrast with their immediate surroundings. The minimum dimensions of each nosing shall be 40 mm × 40 mm.

NOTE: Further guidance on contrast and methods of measurement is provided in SANS 784.

4.9.3 Outdoor stairs and outdoor approaches to stairs shall be so designed that water will not accumulate on walking surfaces.

4.9.4 Tactile guidance, where provided, shall be in accordance with the relevant provisions of SANS 784.

4.10 Handrails

The design and construction of handrails shall be in accordance with the following:

  1. handrails shall have an elliptical gripping surface profile that is approximately 50 mm wide and 40 mm deep, or a circular profile of diameter not less than 35 mm and not more than 50 mm;
  2. the height to the top of a handrail from the nosing of the tread of the stairs or from the surfaces of a ramp shall be in the range 900 mm to 1 000 mm and shall remain consistent along the length;
  3. handrails shall be securely fixed and shall be rigid;
  4. the surface of the handrail and wall, or any other surface adjacent to them, shall be free of any sharp or abrasive elements;
  5. the clear width between a handrail and an adjacent wall shall be at least 60 mm;
  6. handrails shall extend 300 mm horizontally beyond the top and bottom of the ramp or stairway (see figure 12 and shall return to the supporting structure or shall be finished with a positive return, and the minimum dimensions for landings on escape routes as required in SANS 10400-T shall be maintained;
  7. handrails shall be continuous between landings where this does not create a hazard; 19
  8. handrails shall be supported centrally from below with not less than 50 mm between the underside of the handrail and the top of the support;
  9. where a stairway is wider than 2,4 m, a handrail shall be provided at no more than 2,4 m intervals.

NOTE: Handrails that extend at the top and bottom of a stairway are a tactile aid for persons with visual impairments, and a balancing aid for ambulant persons with disabilities.

Accessible Routes, Doors & Doorways

An important part of accessibility is not only accessible parking spaces, passenger loading zones, ramps, Disabled Toilets & Lifts, etc but also insuring that there are various accessible routes from the public streets onto the pavements & to the accessible building entrance and to the facilities inside the building & visa versa. Appropriate accessible routes should also be made available for emergency exits. Accessible Routes include:

  • Ramps on & off the pavement
  • Wide enough walkways for a variety of size wheelchairs
  • No obstacles on these pathways
  • Wide doorways & turning areas, etc

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations passes  laws that insure that new buildings & structures are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes regulations on Accessible Routes.

There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

4.4 External and internal circulation

4.4.1 General

4.4.1.1 An accessible route shall form part of an external and internal circulation route.

NOTE: The space allowances of this part of SANS 10400 should accommodate the use of self-propelled wheelchairs. The minimum dimensions might need to be increased to accommodate the full range of different types of wheelchair.

4.4.1.2 At least one accessible route shall be provided within the boundary of the site from all public transportation stops, accessible parking spaces, passenger loading zones and public streets and pavements to the accessible building entrance which they serve and the facilities inside the building.

4.4.1.3 There shall be a means of access suitable for use by persons with disabilities from the outside of the building to the ground storey.

4.4.1.4 The clear width of the walking surfaces shall not be less than 900 mm (such as between bollards in parking areas, or between planters and seating) and shall not be reduced by protruding objects. If the clear width is less than 1,5 m, an accessible route shall be provided with passing spaces of 1,5 m × 1,5 m (minimum) at intervals not exceeding 5,0 m, or an intersection of two walking surfaces which provide a T-shaped space.

4.4.1.5 Each accessible entrance to a building shall have at least one door or doorway in accordance with the requirements of 4.6.1.

4.4.1.6 Revolving doors, revolving gates and turnstiles shall not form part of an accessible route.

4.4.1.7 Pause areas, with suitable seating, shall be provided adjacent to an accessible route at intervals that do not exceed 25 m.

4.4.2 Turning spaces

4.4.2.1 The turning space allowance, e.g. for a wheelchair, guide dog or person on crutches, shall be a minimum of 1,5 m in diameter, inclusive of any toe and knee clearances.

4.4.2.2 Doors shall not be permitted to swing into the turning spaces.

4.4.3 Obstructions in the path of travel

4.4.3.1 Protruding objects shall not reduce the clear width required for accessible routes.

4.4.3.2 Hanging signs, lights, awnings and objects that protrude into circulation spaces shall have a clearance of at least 2 m above the trafficable surface.

4.4.3.3 Windows and doors shall not open across a walkway, corridor, stair or ramp. Doorstops shall be so positioned that any door will open to its maximum, and that they will not create a hazard.

4.4.3.4 Wall-mounted fire extinguishers, hose reels, telephones, litter bins and any other wall-mounted fittings shall

  1. be designed to be easily seen,
  2. be shielded or recessed to prevent injuries, and
  3. be accompanied by a feature that warns of the presence of the potential hazard and that is possible to detect by a person using a white cane or stick.

4.4.3.5 A dished channel shall not be constructed within the boundaries of a path.

4.4.3.6 A drainage grating that is within the boundaries of a path shall be set flush with the surface of the path. Such grating shall be placed so that its longitudinal elements are perpendicular to the main walking direction, and the gap between them shall not exceed 13 mm.

4.4.3.7 Where identified parking for persons with disabilities is provided, a kerb cut that has a slip-resistant finish and gradient that does not exceed 1:12 shall be provided immediately adjacent to the bay (see figure 3).

NOTE 1: Kerb cuts should be provided where required, and in conjunction with pedestrian crossings, taxi and bus ranks and parking garages.

NOTE 2: The recommended surface between a pavement and roadway is a ramp fitted with tactile guidance surface indicators. This provides a safe and trafficable surface for wheelchair users, and a detectable surface to indicate to persons with visual impairments that they are leaving a pedestrian footpath and entering a traffic roadway.

4.5 Floor or ground surfaces

4.5.1 Floor and ground surfaces form an integral part of the accessible route throughout the site, both internally and externally, as part of the continuous path of travel. They shall be stable, firm and slip resistant (see SANS 784), under wet and dry conditions.

4.5.2 Carpet, carpet tiles or other floor finishes shall be securely attached and level across all types of pile. Pile height of carpets shall not exceed 3 mm.

4.5.3 Openings in the floor finish or ground surface shall not exceed 13 mm in diameter and, where the opening is elongated, the long dimension shall be placed perpendicular to the dominant direction of travel.

4.5.4 The vertical change in level between two floor surfaces, or at thresholds, shall have a flush finish and shall not exceed 5 mm in height.

4.5.5 Where a surface is cambered for drainage purposes, the camber shall not exceed 1:50 (see figure 4).

4.5.6 Cobbles (whether fixed or loose), gravel sand and other raised or loose finishes shall not form part of an accessible route.

4.6 Doorways, Doors and Door Handles

4.6.1 Doorways and Doors

4.6.1.1 Doorways shall allow free access for wheelchair users. The clear opening shall be at least 750 mm when approached along a line that is perpendicular to the opening, as shown in figure 5.

NOTE: It is recommended that, where possible, the clear opening width should be 800 mm.

4.6.1.2 Where a two-leaf door is used, the clear opening provided by the leading leaf shall be at least 750 mm, as shown in figure 6, when approached along a line perpendicular to the opening.

4.6.1.3 Minimum access dimensions to enable wheelchair users to make 90° turns, shall be as shown in figure 7.

4.6.1.4 Where a person in a wheelchair is required to open a door towards the wheelchair, a nib of at least 450 mm shall be provided at the handle side of the door, as shown in figure 8.

4.6.1.5 The minimum distance between doors shall be as shown in figures 9 and 10.

4.6.1.6 Sliding doors may be installed in places where a hinged door would hinder circulation or manoeuvrability.

4.6.1.7 Where revolving doors, turnstiles or other barriers are installed, an alternative means of access shall be installed.

NOTE 1: Doors are a hindrance and their use should be avoided. Where doors cannot be avoided, for example, in a route used for emergency egress, doors should be held open by a mechanism that is safe, comfortable and convenient for persons with disabilities to operate, such as magnetic closers.

NOTE 2: Frequently used doors, such as main entrance self-closing doors, should preferably open automatically and be equipped with a fail-safe system that enables the door to open under emergency conditions

4.6.2 Door Handles

4.6.2.1 A handle fitted to a door leaf of a door in an emergency route or in a feeder route or in any compartment containing toilet facilities for use by persons with disabilities, shall be of the lever type, with a lever at least 150 mm long, and shall be installed at a height that does not exceed 1,0 m above floor level.

4.6.2.2 Round door knobs do not provide an adequate grip for persons with impaired dexterity and shall be avoided.

4.6.2.3 All doors shall be openable with one hand.

4.6.2.4 All door handles shall be horizontally aligned.

4.6.2.5 Door furniture with sharp protruding edges is hazardous and shall not be used.

4.7 Changes in level

4.7.1 In trafficable areas for public use, any changes in level shall comply with the requirements of SANS 10400-D, and with the requirements given in 4.7.2 and 4.7.3.

4.7.2 A raised kerb, not less than 75 mm high, or a skirting rail not more than 300 mm high, measured vertically above the surface, shall be provided on exposed sides of any ramp, stairway, balcony or any similar area where a change in level occurs.

4.7.3 Where a change in level of more than 600 mm occurs, a handrail shall also be provided.

Lifts

Thanks partly to the disability rights movement we have seen an improvement in building accessibility. With the installation of elevators or lifts, buildings are now accessible for persons wheelchairs and persons with Visual Impairments.

A lift (or elevator) is a form of vertical transportation between building floors, levels or decks, commonly used in offices, public buildings and other types of multi-storey accommodation. Lifts can be essential for providing vertical circulation, particularly in tall buildings, for wheelchair and other non-ambulant building users and for the vertical transportation of goods. Some lifts may also be used for firefighting and evacuation purposes.

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations therefore makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes Lifts & the regulations set aside for these Lifts.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

Lifts in buildings must be able to serve the needs of disabled people. This includes ensuring that any commonly used “path of travel” MUST be free of any sort of obstacles that would limit, restrict or endanger people with disabilities who use that route. There must also be absolutely no obstacles that will prevent people with disabilities from accessing facilities within the building. The regulations refer specifically to people with impaired vision, but clearly they also relate to people in wheelchairs, or people who have trouble walking freely.

4.11 Lift Regulations

4.11.1 Lifts include passenger lifts and through-floor lifts, where:

  1. passenger lifts serve all the storeys of the building that can be accessed by the stairway, and
  2. through-floor lifts may be used to serve a partial storey (see SANS 10400-A) of area greater than 100 m2.

NOTE: A through-floor lift can be used in small buildings, as an alternative to a passenger lift.

4.11.2 Passenger lifts shall:

  1. have a minimum internal dimension of 1,1 m in width and 1,4 m in depth, clear of surface finishes;
  2. have a doorway with an unobstructed width of not less than 800 mm;
  3. be fitted with horizontal handrails the full length of the lift car sides at a height of between 850 mm and 1 000 mm above the floor level of the lift;
  4. have a mirror on the top half of the rear wall equal to the width of the lift to enable wheelchair users to back out of the lift where the lift has internal dimensions less than 1,5 m in width and 2,0 m in depth;
  5. have a clear circulation space of not less than 1,5 m × 1,5 m at the entrance of the lift on each floor;
  6. have audible and visible warnings in the lift lobby and lift car to indicate the lift car approaching, the arrival of the lift, the lift doors opening, the lift doors closing, the floor requested and at which floor the lift stops;
  7. have control buttons, including emergency control buttons, that are in accordance with 4.14;
  8. have illuminance on the control panel that is not less than 150 lx;
  9. stop level with the landing on each floor that they serve.

NOTE 1: The provision of the number and size of lifts should take into account the number of persons (persons with disabilities and persons without disabilities) using the site, complex or building. In buildings with large building-user numbers and flow, the size and number of lifts should reflect the fact that a wheelchair user needs to be able to turn when entering or exiting the lift.

NOTE 2: Wheelchair users should not have to travel further than non-wheelchair users to find a means of vertical circulation accessible to them, and they should not have to cross roads or endanger their safety to reach such means.

NOTE 3: To aid persons with visual impairments to operate automatic lifts, tactile identification, both raised numbers on buttons, in contrasting light and dark colours, and Braille lettering adjacent to the number, should be provided at the control panel within the lift car and external to it.

Links

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government or any Organization. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

Gold Level Advert
The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities
Bradshaw leRoux
QuadPara Association of South Africa
Inclusive Design

Looking for a Job, Services & Service Providers

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Welcome to our "Services & Service Providers" page, where you can find Services & Service Providers that you may require by contacting the companies or organisations which have been listed directly below with their logo's and contact details. These companies and organisations have advertised with us to assist us to run this free "Information Service". Please support them, as they have supported Us, by contacting them on the details provided.

If these companies and organisations listed directly below cannot assist you, please "Contact Us" and I will try to assist you, or visit our Search Facility listed further below, to search for the services that you require.

Please Note: We are continually uploading new Services, if your Company or Organization is not listed with us and you would like to support this free service, please send us your details & we will contact you with more information.

Company Type of Impairments Services Provinces Contact Details
Bradshaw LeRoux All Disabilities Disability Inclusion Specialists
Universal Access Consultancy
Gauteng
South Africa

Bradshaw LeRoux
Lesa Bradshaw
Tel: 031 765 2547
lesa@bradshawleroux.co.za
www.bradshawleroux.co.za

National Council of & for Persons with Disabilities All Disabilities Registration of Wheelchair Parking Disks
Universal Access Consultancy
Gauteng
South Africa
National Council of & for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD)
Tel: (011) 452 2774
therina@ncpd.org.za
www.ncpd.org.za
Pro Mobility Shuttle Service Mobility Impairments Accessible Transport Services Natal Pro Mobility
Clinton van den Burg
Cell: 083 775 0611
clinton@pro-mobility.co.za
www.pro-mobility.co.za
Jaco Kruger - Disability Tax Specialist All Disabilities Disability Tax South Africa
Gauteng
Disability Tax Specialist:
Jaco Kruger
Cell:
083 636 9991 jaco@accfinser.com www.disabilitytax.co.za
Rolling Rehab Mobility Impairments Disability Driver Training Gauteng Rolling Rehab
Caroline Rule
Cell: 083 560 6886
caroline@rollingrehab.co.za
www.rollingrehab.co.za
Inclusive Design All Disabilities Universal Access Consultancy Western Cape
South Africa
Inclusive Design
Colette Fransolet
Cell: 072 027 3623
admin@inclusivedesign.co.za
www.inclusivedesign.co.za
Road To Independence Deaf
Persons with Hearing Impairments
Western Cape
South Africa
Road to Independence
Fanie du Toit
Cell: 082 820 7358
fanie@roadtoindependence.co.za
www.roadtoindependence.co.za
Travel with Rene Persons with Mobility Impairments Accessible Transport Services & Vehicle Hire Western Cape Travel with Rene
Rene Moses
Cell: +(27) 82 770 9430
rene@travelwithrene.co.za
www.travelwithrene.co.za
Prima Care Persons with Mobility Impairments Equipment To Rent Western Cape
South Africa
Prima Care
Michael
Head Office:
(021) 555 1596
michael@primacare.co.za
www.primacare.co.za
QuadPara logo Quadriplegics & Paraplegics Accessible Transport Services & Vehicle Hire
Registration of Wheelchair Parking Disks
Natal QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA)
Tel: 031 7670352/48
coo@qasa.co.za
www.qasa.co.za
Safari Bros Persons with Mobility Impairments Accessible Transport Services & Vehicle Hire Gauteng

Safari Bros
Craig Redelinghuys
Cell: + 27 82 827 4449
craig@safaribrothers.co.za
www.safaribus.co.za

Beyond.Access Persons with Mobility Impairments Accessible Transport Services & Vehicle Hire Gauteng

Beyond.Access
Gregory Marks
Cell:
061 524 5277 beyondaccess@access2point0.co.za
Beyond.Access Facebook Page

Ann Harding Mobility Impairments Accessible Accommodation Gauteng

Ann Harding Cheshire Home
Jackie Kyle
Tel: 011 792 3510 Jackie@cheshirehomes.org.za
www.annhardingcheshirehome.org.za

Pop a Wheelchair Mobility Impairments Accessible Transport Services & Vehicle Hire Western Cape

Pop a Wheelchair
Zaeem Rawoot
Cell:
061 430 4302
Whatsapp:
061 430 4302
popawheeliesa@gmail.com
Pop a Wheelchair Facebook Page

If the companies or organisations listed above cannot assist you with the Services that you are looking for, please use the Search Facility below, to search for the Services that you require. Click on your type of Impairment and the area or Province where you live, then click on the type of Services that you are looking for and hit "Search".


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Organizations

Service Providers

Organizations

To view the Organizations available for your Disability, click the button to the right.
To view the Services that are available which some Organizations provide, click the button on the left.

Organizations

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

Since the International Year of Disabled Persons in 1981, persons with disabilities have organized themselves into their own organizations all over the world. These are sometimes called Disabled People's Organizations or DPOs. DPO's are those controlled by a majority of persons with disabilities (51%) at the board and membership levels. The role of these organizations includes providing a voice of their own, identifying needs, expressing views on priorities, evaluating services and advocating change and public awareness. Some Organizations also provide or sell equipment.

DPOs believe that persons with disabilities are their own best spokespersons and their role has been and is fundamental for the human rights movement of persons with disabilities.

There are a variety of different types of disabilities that have there own organizations & these include persons with Visual Impairments.

Types Of Disability Organizations In South Africa

There are a wide range of advocacy and self-help organization which exist in South Africa. They include organisations such as the overtly political Disabled People South Africa, aligned with the ruling African National Congress, National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD), as well as single-issue national organisations such as the QuadPara Association of South Africa, to name just a few.

There are 3 different main types of Disability organisations in South Africa:

In addition to this, there are 3 different types of DPOs:

1. Cross Disability Organizations

Cross-disability organizations represent the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa, and include the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope.

National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD)

NCPD is a NGO with a footprint throughout South Africa that plays a lobbying & advocacy role when it comes to the rights of persons with disabilities. "We're an umbrella body coordinating the advancement of the rights of persons with physical disabilities in accordance with the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and more. We have nine provincial Associations for Persons with Disabilities with numerous projects and branches that focus on rural development as well as social."NCPD

The The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities does advocacy work and services leading to an equitable and inclusive society. "We are affiliated to the South African Disability Alliance, as well as Rehabilitation International. Our programmes cover the whole of South Africa."

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Services

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers a wide variety of different Services, they include:

Job Placement & Skills Development: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities have programs in place that aid persons with disabilities, to find jobs & acquire skills they my need in the workplace. "We offer BBBEE advice and services related to persons with disabilities, including: Job placement, skills development, preferential procurement, ownership and supply chain development."

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Workplace Policy & Disability Equity Training: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers Disability Equality Training courses to address the need for information about reality of disability. Training is tailor made for every sector, including: Tourism, Tertiary Education, Banking, Mining and more. Through training they will find ways to challenge the organisational behaviour which reinforces negative myths and values and which prevents disabled people from gaining equality and achieving full participation in society. Training is done by an expert well trained team of persons with disabilities.

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Children With Disabilities: Our work in respect of children with disabilities focuses on addressing rights violations and promoting their rights, all with the aim of and to contribute to an improved dispensation for this most vulnerable and exposed group of people in our country. Rights violations and advancing the rights of children with disabilities are addressed through advocacy, lobbying and public education and awareness raising.

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Raising Awareness: Living in an age where information is for the most part a click away to a large part of society, should mean that persons with disabilities enjoy all their non-disabled counterparts do, but despite democracy and the information age, persons with disabilities often still find themselves on the side-line when it comes to securing employment or even just having access to enjoy a sports match or theatre production. The need for raising awareness of impairment, disability and related matters, we aim to raise the level of awareness about disability related issues through various initiatives.

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Rural Development: We go to certain areas to ascertain if the information we have on-hand is correct and/or to be up-to-date with the current situation in those areas. The same goes for projects but with projects we also need to see how sustainable these projects are and if they need assistance to either stay the course or change the project toward better outcomes for the participants and beneficiaries of these projects.

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The Dispatch Arts Project: The Dispatch Arts Project is an arts and culture development project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities and is sponsored by the National Lotteries Commission. The project’s aim is to facilitate the inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in all aspects of community life in South Africa. It is a platform through which rural artists with disabilities can showcase their talents and handicrafts and make a decent living in the process.

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Training: The NCPD is proud to be in a position to offer various SETA accredited training courses ( short course, learnerships and internships) together with corporate partners whom then get their BBBEE POINTS for the DTI scorecard. We also do short training of Professionals in the Services and Health profession , for which these professionals get CPD points. The courses for architects, and other professionals is not accredited for CPD points. Other training includes Caregiver training for carers of children or adults; Governance training; Fundraising training; Disability Equity training; Reasonable accommodation; Inclusive design; Various impairments and the implications; Drivers of persons with disabilities; Human Rights and advocacy; Assistive device repairs & Transport and driving training. The majority of training sessions can be tailor-made to suit your needs.

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Universal Design & Access: Persons with disabilities are excluded from many events, services, information, communication, products and venues, due to all users were not considered during the planning phases. The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can assist to prevent this from happening by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase.

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Other Services: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can also supply information and assist with a variety of other Services, including: audits; work placements and reasonable accommodation; internships and training; entrepreneurs with disabilities; disability information and children’s programmes; referrals of persons with disabilities needing our services. Contact us for more information on: Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or Email: edwina@ncpd.org.za or read the article below about the Fund Raising Partnerships that the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities are involved in.

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Fund Raising Partnerships

Casual Day

Image Courtesy of NCPD

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities organize and run a number of fun raising projects to help raise funds including "Casual Day" and the "Nappy Run":
( Click image on the right to enlarge. )

"Casual Day: is South Africa’s leading fundraising & awareness campaign for persons with disabilities and is the flagship project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD). Casual Day was launched in 1995 and is an awareness and fundraising campaign benefiting persons with disabilities. Each year on the first Friday of September, South Africans are encouraged to go to work or school dressed differently and to wear the official Casual Day sticker to show their support for persons with disabilities."

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"Nappy Run: is a 5km Fun Run which takes place at the Joburg Zoo every year coinciding with National Children’s Day, the purpose of the Nappy Run™ campaign is to educate the public on the violation of rights of our country’s most marginalized and vulnerable group of people – children with disabilities and to appeal to the public for online donations which go towards the purchase of nappies for children with disabilities.

The event is organised by the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and forms part of the NCPD’s observation of South Africa’s Disability Rights Awareness Month (DRAM) in November. The Nappy Run campaign runs until 3 December to coincide with the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), while DRAM also culminates on that same day. For more information about the Nappy Run™ fun run, or to make a donation, visit www.nappyrun.org.za, or find them on Facebook - @Nappyrun.sa | Instagram - @Nappyrun.sa |Twitter - @NappyRun. Alternatively, email them on: info@nappyrun.org.za."

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Champion Of Hope

Champion of Hope is a Non Profit organization of and for Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV Aids Virus in the Pixley ka Seme Region in the Northern Cape. At Champion of Hope we believe in the abilities of Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV/Aids Virus and choose to focus on the positives and therefore develop our clients through Skills Development and Skills Training.Champion Of Hope

Our main objective is to assist People Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired and those affected and infected with the HIV/ Aids Virus who has low skills and high poverty levels to reach their true potential in life and in this way to lobby a living wage for themselves.

Our full list of services includes: Skills Development & Skills Training; Economic Empowerment; Income Generation; Job Creation; Job Placement; Sports Development & Sports Training; Fundraising; Awareness & Promotion; Accessibility & Mobility; Women’s Programs; Youth Programs; Children’s Programs; Early Childhood Development Programs; Support Groups; Social Clubs & Book Clubs and Mini  Libraries for the Sight Impaired in collaboration with Department of Sports, Arts and Culture.

You can contact Esme Fourie T/A Champion Of Hope (102 - 568 - NPO) at nr 80 Mainstreet De Aar 7000 or via Mobile: 078 886 7902 • Fax: 086 587 4779/ Whatsapp: 0657008851 or Email: infocoh949@gmail.com

2. Diagnostic Focused Organizations

Diagnostic-focused organizations, such as Blind SA & The South African National Council for the Blind represent a medical diagnostic group, such as the Blind.

Blind SA

Blind SA originally started on 26 October 1946 as the South African Blind Worker’s Organisation to help the blind find meaningful careers. In 2004 it became Blind SA. Blind SA is governed by its members who elect the Head Committee. We insist on self-representation and work and speak from the viewpoint of blind people. We stand for equality, advocating the rights of the blindBlind SA throughout South Africa. Based in Johannesburg, we serve the blind community at large, we equip blind people with the skills they need to fully and independently participate in society. This includes support in living without assistance, getting about, using technology, reading, working and socialising. All this is made possible through advocacy, our Education Committee, Braille Services, Equipment, Mali-Bhala, Orientation & Mobility Practitioners and our employment programme. It is through this, and the support of our donors, that we connect South African’s who are blind or visually impaired with the world they live in.

Our Services Include:

Education: One of our primary goals is to promote quality education for all learners with visual impairments in South Africa. Our Education Committee addresses all issues concerning education from pre-school intervention to general, further and tertiary education and training, as well as adult basic education and training.

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Facilities and Support: It is crucial that specialised schools and resource centres are developed and strengthened to accommodate the blind and visually impaired. Our committee will also support learners who can cope in mainstream schools, provided that adequate assistance is provided by education authorities and that the parents of the learners have made informed decisions. The Education Committee will continue to oversee the education and training of learners, as it is their constitutional right. We also offer Interest-free loans to assist with living costs and study materials.Where appropriate, financial assistance is extended to parents or guardians of children who are at school. This is done through Blind SA’s Learners’ Fund.

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Employment: Getting a job is the starting point of self-sufficiency and dignity for most people, with no exception to the blind. In 1946, Blind SA (formerly SABWO) was formed to help blind and visually impaired South Africans. People who are blind or visually impaired can be found working in most industries. With the right skills, training and technology there are few jobs the blind and visually impaired cannot do. Our assistance can successfully help integrate blind people into their new roles and into businesses.

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Orientation and Mobility Practitioners: We provide independent training to blind and partially sighted persons so that they may live independently without depending on other people to take them around or perform skills of daily living on their behalf. We aim to change the attitudes of the sighted people towards people who have visual disability and educate them on how to assist a blind person and also to respect the cane. Through “Orientation and Mobility” we also train clients to enhance the learner’s personal mobility skills, and to develop insight into the challenges facing persons who are blind and partially sighted.

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Braille Services: Blind SA established Braille Services in 1953 and is the only producer of braille in all eleven official languages of South Africa. Access to the written word is the greatest communication barrier blind folk face. Despite advancements in audio technology, reading and writing can only be attained through braille, making it key to literacy. We produce braille to order only, and try to meet the reading needs of all our customers. Each page of every textbook needs to be transcribed into a braille master page, then duplicated and bound into useful study aids. Our Heidelberg GT Platen Press allows for quick production and our Viewplus Braille and state-of-the-art software means we can print tactile diagrams and pictures.

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Equipment: Blind SA stock and sell a variety of Assistive Devices to assist persons who are Blind, this includes the:

  • Mali-Bhala – a money counter and signature guide. Read More: ….
  • The Tatrapoint Mechanical Brailler - is a more cost effective affordable braille writing machine manufactured in Slovakia. Blind SA imported two orders of 30 and 45 units to sell. Read More: ….
  • Braille-Me - is an electronic braille note-taker and display produced in India. Blind SA entered into an exclusive distributor agreement after having tested the device. Read More: ….

Visit the Orientation and Mobility page on the Blind SA website to view more information on the Services & Products they supply or contact Blind SA on: Tel: +27 11 839 1793/4 or Email: ceo@blindsa.org.za, or visit us at: Address: 102 Eighth Avenue, Mayfair, Gauteng, South Africa. Website: www.blindsa.org.za

The South African National Council for the Blind (SANCB)

The South African Council for the Blind (SANCB) is a registered non-profit and public benefit organisation established in 1929 with four mission focus areas which include Prevention; Inclusion; Advocacy & Support. As a South African national representative body for the blind, it offers supportive, rights driven function to its nearly 80 member-organisations. The presence of its community work is felt throughout its nine provincial structures in South Africa. The SANCB also lays emphasis on theSouth African Council for the Blind prevention of blindness and in 1944 the Bureau for the Prevention of Blindness was established. Since then, SANCB has grown exponentially, adding Education and Rehabilitation to its portfolio in 1985; the Resource Centre for Assistive Devices and Technology which is now known as the Assistive Technology Centre in 1986 and Entrepreneurial Development and support in 1991. The South African National Council for the Blind also supplies assistive devices and related technologies to persons with visual impairments.

“Our Mission serves and supports community empowerment; rehabilitation; training and education of South Africans with visual impairments, we also facilitate the prevention of blindness, while our Vision is enhanced facilitation and collaborations with a network of Organizations for the full participation and inclusion of blind and partially sighted people in all aspects of a diverse South African society."

The services and support they supply to South Africans with visual impairments, include:

  • Facilitate collaborative partnerships to serve the interests of visually impaired South Africans
  • Advocate on behalf of persons with visual impairments
  • Develop and maintain standards for services offered to persons with visual impairments
  • Promote the education, training and rehabilitation relevant for the employment of persons with visual impairments
  • Help organisations for and of the blind to deliver effective and relevant services
  • Gather and disseminate information on matters concerning visual impairment
  • Initiate and implement projects beneficial to persons with visual impairments
  • Supply assistive devices and related technologies to persons with visual impairments
  • Preserve and restore sight and prevent blindness
  • Work together with international organisations for the improvement of the quality of life of persons with visual impairments
  • Create awareness of the skills, capacities and abilities of persons with visual impairments
  • Ensure that blind and partially sighted people of all ages enjoy all rights promised by the Constitution of South Africa.

You can contact the South African Council for the Blind (SANCB) to find out more on +27 12 452 3811 or +27 63 686 8098. Alternatively you can email them on: helpdesk@sancb.org.za or visit their website: www.sancb.org.za. You can also visit them at their offices at 514 White Street, Bailey's Muckleneuk, Pretoria, South Africa, 0181.

Provincial Organizations

Within the "The South African National Council for the Blind" are organizations that represent medical diagnostic groups, at provincial level, these organisations assist it's members in a particular province. An example of this is The Western Cape Blind Association (WEBA) which assists its members in the Western Cape.

The Western Cape Blind Association (WEBA): is now known as the ‘Light and Healing Centre’, offer an outreach service to companies, organisations, churches and government departments and set out to give hope, healing of brokenness and restoring lost dignity of blind and partially sighted men and women. They offer aromatherapy, lymph drainage and reflexology massages, pedicures and manicures and also offer Self Help Workshops once a month. Contact them on the link below to find out more.

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3. Population Specific Organizations

Population-specific Organizations are those DPOs which represent a population group such as the  South African blind women in action).

Sports Organizations

There are also a wide variety of Sports Organizations, including the:

  1. International organizations such as the International Paralympic Committee (IPC) & International Blind Sports Federation (IBSA)
  2. National sports organizations that govern abeld bodied sports, as well as some disability sports, such as The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC).
  3. SASAPD (South African Sports Association for Physically Disabled), which govern some physically disabled sports.
  4. Provincial Sports organizations, such as The Free State Sport Association for the Physically Disabled & Visually Impaired.
  5. Sports Club Organizations which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa.

1. International Paralympic Committee

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) is the global governing body of the Paralympic Movement. Its purpose is to organise the summer and winter Paralympic Games and act as the International Federation for ten sports, supervising and coordinating World Championships and other competitions.

The vision of the IPC, run by 200 members, is ‘To enable Para athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world.’

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1. International Blind Sports Federation (IBSA)

The IBSA World Championships and Games is held every four years and is organized & run by The International Blind Sports Federation (IBSA), which is a nonprofit organization founded 1981 in Paris, France. IBSA's mission is to promote the full integration of blind and partially sighted people in society through sport and to encourage persons with a visual impairments to take up and practice sports. IBSA is a full and founding member of the International Paralympic Committee (IPC).

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2. The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC)

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) is the National Olympic Committee (NOC) and National Paralympic Committee (NPC) for South Africa, and are the responsible body for South Africa at the Commonwealth Games. SASCOC is also responsible for high-performance sport in the country and coordinates the relationship with various international sports federations. They not only help look after all our various National Federations who are affiliated to them, but are responsible for awarding National Protea Colours to athletes who have met the criteria to represent South Africa in different sporting codes, including:

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3. The South African Sports Association for Physically Disabled (SASAPD)

 The South African Sports Association for Physically Disabled ( SASAPD) was established in 1962 and focuses on the development and promotion of the sporting codes offered at Paralympic level for athletes with Physical Disabilities, Visual Impairments and blindness.

They offer pathways for qualification towards Paralympic Games across a variety of sports, through their affiliations with international bodies such as IBSA, IWAS, CPISRA and The Nedbank National Championships for Physically Disabled.

They also work and are an affiliate member of SASCOC as well as being associated members of a number of other national sporting federations.

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4. Provincial Sports Associations

There are also many Provincial Sports Associations that govern a variety sports in a particular province in South Africa, such as:

The Free State Sport Association for the Physically Disabled and Visually Impaired:  have a sound understanding and passion to build character through sport. "Our executive has years of experience working with the disabled in sport and other social environments. We have an in-depth understanding of our sport codes and the special classification criteria that is associated with each code."

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5. Sports Club Organizations

Some Sports Club Organizations are also available, which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa, these clubs may include "Disabled" and Abled Body athletes or just "Disabled" athletes. There are a variety of these clubs in South Africa, including:

The Differently Abled Cricket Club: which is an open cricket club for the differently abledcricket players, which includes the Blind, Deaf, Intellectually Impaired (SID and MID) and Physically Disabled. "We are the only club of this kind in South Africa and we would like to make it our goal in getting other regions to follow suit! "

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To find a Sports Organization or Club that can assist you, visit our "Activities, Sports Organizations & Clubs" Search Facility on the following link: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/sports-clubs-organizations/ or visit our "Sport for Visual Impairments" to find out more about the sports that are available for you.

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

 

Gold Level Advert
National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities
Champion Of Hope
Blind SA
South African Council for the Blind
 Differently Abled Cricket Club (DACC)

Organizations

Service Providers

Organizations

To view the Organizations available for your Disability, click the button to the right.
To view the Services that are available which some Organizations provide, click the button on the left.

Organizations

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

Since the International Year of Disabled Persons in 1981, persons with disabilities have organized themselves into their own organizations all over the world. These organizations are sometimes called Disabled People's Organizations or DPOs. DPO's are those controlled by a majority of persons with disabilities (51%) at the board and membership levels. The role of these organizations includes: providing a voice of their own, identifying needs, expressing views on priorities, evaluating services and advocating change and public awareness and Some Organizations also provide or sell equipment.

DPOs believe that persons with disabilities are their own best spokespersons and their role has been and is fundamental for the human rights movement of persons with disabilities. There are a variety of different types of disabilities that have there own organizations & these include The Deaf or persons with Hearing Impairments.

Types Of Disability Organizations In South Africa

There are a wide range of advocacy and self-help organization which exist in South Africa. They include organisations such as the overtly political Disabled People South Africa, aligned with the ruling African National Congress, National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope, as well as single-issue national organisations such as the South African National Deaf Association (SANDA), to name just a few.

There are 3 different main types of Disability organisations in South Africa:

  1. Cross-disability organizations, such as the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope, which represents the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa.
  2. Diagnostic-focused Organizations such as the South African National Deaf Association (SANDA) and DeafSA, which represent a medical diagnostic group, such as The Deaf, Hearing Impaired or Hard of Hearing. Within these DPOs that represent medical diagnostic groups, are provincial organisations to assist it's members in a particular province and are associated with the The Deaf Federation of South Africa (DeafSA) , but the do assist members in specific provinces, such as DeafSA Western Cape.
  3. Population-specific organizations,  represent a population group, such as the South African Deaf Women Association.

1. Cross Disability Organizations

Cross-disability organizations represent the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa, and include the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope.

National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD)

The NCPD is a NGO with a footprint throughout South Africa that plays a lobbying & advocacy role when it comes to the rights of persons with disabilities. "We're an umbrella body coordinating the advancement of the rights of persons with physical disabilities in accordance with the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and more. We have nine provincial Associations for Persons with Disabilities with numerous projects and branches that focus on rural development as well as social."NCPD

The The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities does advocacy work and services leading to an equitable and inclusive society. "We are affiliated to the South African Disability Alliance, as well as Rehabilitation International. Our programmes cover the whole of South Africa."

Services

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers a wide variety of different Services, they include:

Job Placement & Skills Development: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities have programs in place that aid persons with disabilities, to find jobs & acquire skills they my need in the workplace. "We offer BBBEE advice and services related to persons with disabilities, including: Job placement, skills development, preferential procurement, ownership and supply chain development."

Read More: .....

Workplace Policy & Disability Equity Training: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers Disability Equality Training courses to address the need for information about reality of disability. Training is tailor made for every sector, including: Tourism, Tertiary Education, Banking, Mining and more. Through training they will find ways to challenge the organisational behaviour which reinforces negative myths and values and which prevents disabled people from gaining equality and achieving full participation in society. Training is done by an expert well trained team of persons with disabilities.

Read More: .....

Children With Disabilities: Our work in respect of children with disabilities focuses on addressing rights violations and promoting their rights, all with the aim of and to contribute to an improved dispensation for this most vulnerable and exposed group of people in our country. Rights violations and advancing the rights of children with disabilities are addressed through advocacy, lobbying and public education and awareness raising.

Read More: .... 

Raising Awareness: Living in an age where information is for the most part a click away to a large part of society, should mean that persons with disabilities enjoy all their non-disabled counterparts do, but despite democracy and the information age, persons with disabilities often still find themselves on the side-line when it comes to securing employment or even just having access to enjoy a sports match or theatre production. The need for raising awareness of impairment, disability and related matters, we aim to raise the level of awareness about disability related issues through various initiatives.

Read More: ....

Rural Development: We go to certain areas to ascertain if the information we have on-hand is correct and/or to be up-to-date with the current situation in those areas. The same goes for projects but with projects we also need to see how sustainable these projects are and if they need assistance to either stay the course or change the project toward better outcomes for the participants and beneficiaries of these projects.

Read More: ....

The Dispatch Arts Project: The Dispatch Arts Project is an arts and culture development project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities and is sponsored by the National Lotteries Commission. The project’s aim is to facilitate the inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in all aspects of community life in South Africa. It is a platform through which rural artists with disabilities can showcase their talents and handicrafts and make a decent living in the process.

Read More: ....

Training: The NCPD is proud to be in a position to offer various SETA accredited training courses ( short course, learnerships and internships) together with corporate partners whom then get their BBBEE POINTS for the DTI scorecard. We also do short training of Professionals in the Services and Health profession , for which these professionals get CPD points. The courses for architects, and other professionals is not accredited for CPD points. Other training includes Caregiver training for carers of children or adults; Governance training; Fundraising training; Disability Equity training; Reasonable accommodation; Inclusive design; Various impairments and the implications; Drivers of persons with disabilities; Human Rights and advocacy; Assistive device repairs & Transport and driving training. The majority of training sessions can be tailor-made to suit your needs.

Read More: ....

Universal Design & Access: Persons with disabilities including The Deaf and persons with Hearing Impairments are often excluded from many events, services, information, communication, products and venues, due to all users were not considered during the planning phases. The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can assist to prevent this from happening by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase.

Many public and private sector bodies have gradually realised that their work practices and policies fall far short of fulfilling the needs, rights and aspirations of disabled people who are their clients, customers and co-workers and that, in order to change this situation, they need to turn to disabled people for education and guidance. From this realisation has grown the demand for Disability Equality Training (DET) run by disabled people, which aims to help people understand the meaning of disability, identify changes in work practice, and plan strategies to implement change.NCPD

Disability Equality Training courses have been organised and run by disabled people and organizations to address the need for information about reality of disability. A DET course will enable participants to identify and address discriminatory forms of practice towards disabled people. Through training they will find ways to challenge the organisational behaviour which reinforces negative myths and values and which prevents disabled people from gaining equality and achieving full participation in society.

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers training is done by an expert well trained team of persons with disabilities and is inclusive of all impairments and addresses definitions, an inclusive workplace, reasonable accommodation, terminology and much more!  The sessions are at least three hours, but can be up to two days (depending on the needs of the client). "Training is done in inter - actively, using multimedia and is not “heavy”!!! Training is tailor made for every sector, including:  Tourism, Tertiary Education, Banking, Mining and more."

For references, contact:

Read More: ....

Hearing loss training and empowerment activities: Hearing loss can happen to anyone and NCPD would like to address the lack of services and support for this marginalised group through specific training and empowerment activities.

We provide the following to corporates:

  • To reach full potential in the workplace despite deafness or hearing impairment.
  • Communicating with deaf or hearing impaired employees in the work place.
  • From Paper to Practice: The White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and the reasonable accommodation of persons with impairments/disabilities. (Accredited with 6 CPD points from HPCSA)

Workshops for Professionals working in the field of hearing loss and disability:

  • The Protocol and Guideline for identifying  functional needs of a hearing impaired or deaf adult ( accredited with 5 CPD points from HPCSA)

The following session is available to individuals, family members, NGO’s and NPO’s (including retirement centres):

  • Making the most of life despite hearing loss.

Please click on the following links for more information on hearing loss:

For more information contact Michele Tonks: michele@ncpd.org.za or Fanie du Toit: fanie.dt@ncpd.org.za

Short CV/bio:Fanie du Toit

  • Specialist of Hearing impairment & deaf affairs for the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities.
  • Founder member of the Association for Hearing Loss Accessibility and Development (www.ahlad.org)
  • Adult Education Practitioner
  • Presenter of “Leefwêreld van die Gestremde” on RSG and other community and national radio stations.

Fanie experienced severe hearing loss for many years, but after 29 years had the miracle of being able to hear again after bilateral cochlear implants in 2011.

Read More: .....

Other Services: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can also supply information and assist with a variety of other Services, including: audits; work placements and reasonable accommodation; internships and training; entrepreneurs with disabilities; disability information and children’s programs; referrals of persons with disabilities needing our services.

Contact us for more information on: Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or Email: edwina@ncpd.org.za or read the article below about the Fund Raising Partnerships that the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities are involved in.

Read More: .....

Fund Raising PartnershipsCasual Day

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities organize and run a number of fun raising projects to help raise funds including "Casual Day" and the "Nappy Run": ( Click image on the right to enlarge. )

"Casual Day: is South Africa’s leading fundraising & awareness campaign for persons with disabilities and is the flagship project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD). Casual Day was launched in 1995 and is an awareness and fundraising campaign benefiting persons with disabilities. Each year on the first Friday of September, South Africans are encouraged to go to work or school dressed differently and to wear the official Casual Day sticker to show their support for persons with disabilities."

Read More: ......

"Nappy Run: is a 5km Fun Run which takes place at the Joburg Zoo every year coinciding with National Children’s Day, the purpose of the Nappy Run™ campaign is to educate the public on the violation of rights of our country’s most marginalized and vulnerable group of people – children with disabilities and to appeal to the public for online donations which go towards the purchase of nappies for children with disabilities.

The event is organised by the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and forms part of the NCPD’s observation of South Africa’s Disability Rights Awareness Month (DRAM) in November. The Nappy Run campaign runs until 3 December to coincide with the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), while DRAM also culminates on that same day. For more information about the Nappy Run™ fun run, or to make a donation, visit www.nappyrun.org.za, or find them on Facebook - @Nappyrun.sa | Instagram - @Nappyrun.sa |Twitter - @NappyRun. Alternatively, email them on: info@nappyrun.org.za."

Read More: .....

Champion Of Hope

Champion of Hope is a Non Profit organization of and for Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV Aids Virus in the Pixley ka Seme Region in the Northern Cape. At Champion of Hope we believe in the abilities of Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV/Aids Virus and choose to focus on the positives and therefore develop our clients through Skills Development and Skills Training.Champion Of Hope

Our main objective is to assist People Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired and those affected and infected with the HIV/ Aids Virus who has low skills and high poverty levels to reach their true potential in life and in this way to lobby a living wage for themselves.

Our full list of services includes: Skills Development & Skills Training; Economic Empowerment; Income Generation; Job Creation; Job Placement; Sports Development & Sports Training; Fundraising; Awareness & Promotion; Accessibility & Mobility; Women’s Programs; Youth Programs; Children’s Programs; Early Childhood Development Programs; Support Groups; Social Clubs & Book Clubs and Mini  Libraries for the Sight Impaired in collaboration with Department of Sports, Arts and Culture.

You can contact Esme Fourie T/A Champion Of Hope (102 - 568 - NPO) at nr 80 Mainstreet De Aar 7000 or via Mobile: 078 886 7902 • Fax: 086 587 4779/ Whatsapp: 0657008851 or Email: infocoh949@gmail.com

2. Diagnostic Focused Organizations

Diagnostic-focused organizations are those DPO's such as the South African National Deaf Association (SANDA) and DeafSA, which represent a medical diagnostic group, such as The Deaf, Hearing Impaired or Hard of Hearing.

South African National Deaf Association (SANDA)

South African National Deaf Association is a leading independent not for profit, public benefit, national advocacy and consumer organization, registered both as a section 21 company and Non-Profit Organisation (NPO). SANDA was founded in 2004 and is managed by Deaf people and represents more than 4 million Deaf and hard of hearing South Africa's. SANDA is the human rights and advocacy organisation of, by and for Deaf people, its core business is advocacy. The organisation complements the work of government and provides a good basis for partnership particularly in relation to programmes in advocacy, awareness and public education; Deaf education, skills development and scholarship, economic empowerment; ICT; Deaf women and Deaf youth development programmes as well as mainstreaming of Deaf people in society.

Read More: ....

The Deaf Federation of South Africa (DeafSA)

"The Deaf Federation of South Africa (DeafSA) acts as the national research, information and community action organisation on behalf of ± 1.5 million South Africans that are culturally and linguistically Deaf, hard of hearing and Deafblind. DeafSA was formerly known as the South African National Council for the Deaf (SANCD), which was founded in 1929. DeafSA promotes the interests of the Deaf and hard of hearing effectively on national level in South Africa. DeafSA’s national constitution and activities are, therefore, aimed at all people who are Deaf, hard of hearing or Deafblind. DeafSA embraces diversity and inclusiveness as core values in achieving its mission. It is the philosophy of DeafSA that diversity encompasses a wide range of human abilities and perspectives, they are committed to building and maintaining an inclusive environment where differences of opinions, beliefs, and values are sought, listened to, respected, and valued. Through inclusiveness, DeafSA is committed to expanding membership, participation, and leadership that reflect the diversity of the South African Deaf community."

Read More: ....

Provincial Organizations

Within these DPOs that represent medical diagnostic groups, are provincial organisations to assist it's members in a particular province. An example of this is:

DeafSA Western Cape: which are associated with DeafSA along with 8 other Deaf Provincial Federations (DPFs) throughout South Africa. DeafSA along with 9 provincial organizations facilities services to the South African Deaf, Deafened and hard of hearing communities in the Western Cape and other provinces.

Read more: .....

3. Population Specific Organization

Population-specific organizations are those DPOs which represent a specific population group, such as the South African Deaf Women Association.

The South African Deaf Women Association: provide a wide variety of Services country wide. South Africa is a vast country and complex, Deaf women are scattered throughout the country, which makes networking critically important for exchanging of information, empowerment and enhancement in the quality of lives for all Deaf women. Their Services that The South African Deaf Women Association provide include: Advocacy, lobbying and awareness; Capacity building, training, and empowerment; Networking and strategic partnerships; Information, communication and technology (ICT); Equitable access to service delivery and Deaf women education.

Read More: .....

Sports Organizations

There are also a wide variety of Sports Organizations, including the:

  1. International organizations such as the The International Committee of Sports for the Deaf (ICSD).
  2. National sports organizations that govern abeld bodied sports, as well as some disability sports, such as The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC).
  3. South African Deaf Sports Federation, which governs some sports for The Deaf or persons with Hearing Impairments.
  4. The Provincial Organizations which governs provincial sports for The Deaf, or persons with Hearing Impairments in particular provinces.
  5. Sports Club Organizations which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa.

1. The International Committee of Sports for the Deaf (ICSD)Deaflympics

The International Committee of Sports for the Deaf (ICSD) is the main governing body responsible for the organization of Deaflympics and other World Deaf Championships. It was founded in 1924 and is now approaching the century mark of being the organization behind the building, evolving and fortifying the tradition of inviting deaf/hard of hearing elite athletes from all of the world to come together not only to compete in their respective sports, but to also develop comradeships between their countries.

The Deaflympics (previously called World Games for the Deaf, and International Games for the Deaf) are an International Olympic Committee (IOC)-sanctioned event at which deaf athletes compete at an elite level.

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2. The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC)

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) is the National Olympic Committee (NOC) and National Paralympic Committee (NPC) for South Africa, and are the responsible body for South Africa at the CommonwealthSASCOC Games. SASCOC is also responsible for high-performance sport in the country and coordinates the relationship with various international sports federations. They not only help look after all our various National Federations who are affiliated to them, but are responsible for awarding National Protea Colours to athletes who have met the criteria to represent South Africa in different sporting codes, including:

Read More: .....

3. South African Deaf Sports Federation 

The SADSF currently promotes 10 sport codes, namely: Athletics; Cricket; Soccer; Netball; Volleyball; Golf; Table Tennis; Swimming; Squash and Cycling. Most of these codes have their own structures and constitutions and are, as provided for in the SADSF Constitution, affiliated to the SADSF which is a National controlling body that facilitates the administration and coordination of each of these 10 Sport Codes to the highest level of excellence. SADSF further has 9 constituted Provincial structures that are responsible for the identification and development of sporting talent for Deaf at grassroots level and also for the administering and coordination of sport for the Deaf at a Provincial level. South African Deaf Games take place biannually, depending on the availability of funds. 

Read More: .....

4. Provincial Sports Associations

There are various provincial Deaf cricket teams such as:

The Gauteng Deaf Cricket: which was founded in 1975 with the aim of becoming the flagship provincial Deaf Team of South Africa. They also one of the oldest Provincial teams in Deaf Cricket in South Africa and are actively involved in grass roots development.

Read More: ....

5. Sports Club Organizations

Some Sports Club Organizations are also available, which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa, these clubs may include "Disabled" and Abled Body athletes or just "Disabled" athletes. There are a variety of these clubs in South Africa, including:

The Differently Abled Cricket Club: which is an open cricket club for the differently abled cricket players, which includes the Blind, Deaf, Intellectually Impaired (SID and MID) and Physically Disabled. We are the only club of this kind in South Africa and we would like to make it our goal in getting other regions to follow suit! "

Read More: .....

If you would like to find out more about these & other Sports Organizations or the sports that are available for you, you can visit our Sports Page:http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/hearing-impairments/sport-for-hearing-impaired/.

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government or any Organization. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

 

Gold Level Advert
National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities
 Differently Abled Cricket Club (DACC)
Champion Of Hope

Organizations

Service Providers

Organizations

To view the Organizations available for your Disability, click the button to the right.
To view the Services that are available which some Organizations provide, click the button on the left.

Organizations

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

Since the International Year of Disabled Persons in 1981,  people with disability have organized themselves into their own organizations all over  the world including South Africa. Disabled People's Organizations (DPOs) are  those controlled by a majority of people with disability (51%) at the board and  membership levels. The role of these organizations includes providing a voice of their own, identifying needs, expressing views on priorities, evaluating services and advocating change and public awareness.

DPOs believe that people with disability are their own best spokespersons and their role has been and is fundamental for the human rights movement of people with disability.

Types Of Disability Organizations In South Africa

There are a wide range of advocacy and self-help organization which exist in South Africa. They include organisations such as the overtly political Disabled People South Africa, aligned with the ruling African National Congress, National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope, as well as single-issue national organisations such as the SA Federation for Mental Health (SAFMH) and Down Syndrome South Africa, to name just a few.

There are 3 different main types of Disability organisations in South Africa:

  1. Cross-disability organizations, such as the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope, which represents the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa.
  2. Diagnostic-focused organizations which represent a medical diagnostic group such as the SA Federation for Mental Health (SAFMH) and Down Syndrome South Africa. Within these DPOs that represent medical diagnostic groups, are provincial organisations to assist it's members in a particular province, such as Down Syndrome Association of the Western Cape (DSAWC)
  3. Population-specific organizations, represent a population group such as children with disabilities, an example of this is The Sunshine Association.

1. Cross Disability Organizations

Cross-disability organizations represent the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa, and include the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope.

National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD)

The NCPD is a NGO with a footprint throughout South Africa that plays a lobbying & advocacy role when it comes to the rights of persons with disabilities. "We're an umbrella body coordinating the advancement of the rights of persons with physical disabilities in accordance with the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and more. We have nine provincial Associations for Persons with Disabilities with numerous projects and branches that focus on rural development as well as social."NCPD

The The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities does advocacy work and services leading to an equitable and inclusive society. "We are affiliated to the South African Disability Alliance, as well as Rehabilitation International. Our programmes cover the whole of South Africa."

Services

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers a wide variety of different Services, they include:

Job Placement & Skills Development: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities have programs in place that aid persons with disabilities, to find jobs & acquire skills they my need in the workplace. "We offer BBBEE advice and services related to persons with disabilities, including: Job placement, skills development, preferential procurement, ownership and supply chain development."

Read More: .....

Workplace Policy & Disability Equity Training: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers Disability Equality Training courses to address the need for information about reality of disability. Training is tailor made for every sector, including: Tourism, Tertiary Education, Banking, Mining and more. Through training they will find ways to challenge the organisational behaviour which reinforces negative myths and values and which prevents disabled people from gaining equality and achieving full participation in society. Training is done by an expert well trained team of persons with disabilities.

Read More: .....

Children With Disabilities: Our work in respect of children with disabilities focuses on addressing rights violations and promoting their rights, all with the aim of and to contribute to an improved dispensation for this most vulnerable and exposed group of people in our country. Rights violations and advancing the rights of children with disabilities are addressed through advocacy, lobbying and public education and awareness raising.

Read More: ....

Raising Awareness: Living in an age where information is for the most part a click away to a large part of society, should mean that persons with disabilities enjoy all their non-disabled counterparts do, but despite democracy and the information age, persons with disabilities often still find themselves on the side-line when it comes to securing employment or even just having access to enjoy a sports match or theatre production. The need for raising awareness of impairment, disability and related matters, we aim to raise the level of awareness about disability related issues through various initiatives.

Read More: ....

Rural Development: We go to certain areas to ascertain if the information we have on-hand is correct and/or to be up-to-date with the current situation in those areas. The same goes for projects but with projects we also need to see how sustainable these projects are and if they need assistance to either stay the course or change the project toward better outcomes for the participants and beneficiaries of these projects.

Read More: ....

The Dispatch Arts Project: The Dispatch Arts Project is an arts and culture development project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities and is sponsored by the National Lotteries Commission. The project’s aim is to facilitate the inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in all aspects of community life in South Africa. It is a platform through which rural artists with disabilities can showcase their talents and handicrafts and make a decent living in the process.

Read More: ....

Training: The NCPD is proud to be in a position to offer various SETA accredited training courses ( short course, learnerships and internships) together with corporate partners whom then get their BBBEE POINTS for the DTI scorecard. We also do short training of Professionals in the Services and Health profession , for which these professionals get CPD points. The courses for architects, and other professionals is not accredited for CPD points. Other training includes Caregiver training for carers of children or adults; Governance training; Fundraising training; Disability Equity training; Reasonable accommodation; Inclusive design; Various impairments and the implications; Drivers of persons with disabilities; Human Rights and advocacy; Assistive device repairs & Transport and driving training. The majority of training sessions can be tailor-made to suit your needs.

Read More: ....

Universal Design & Access: Persons with disabilities including persons with Intellectual Impairments are often excluded from many events, services, information, communication, products and venues, due to all users were not considered during the planning phases. The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can assist to prevent this from happening by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase.

Many public and private sector bodies have gradually realised that their work practices and policies fall far short of fulfilling the needs, rights and aspirations of disabled people who are their clients, customers and co-workers and that, in order to change this situation, they need to turn to disabled people for education and guidance. From this realisation has grown the demand for Disability Equality Training (DET) run by disabled people, which aims to help people understand the meaning of disability, identify changes in work practice, and plan strategies to implement change.NCPD

Disability Equality Training courses have been organised and run by disabled people and organizations to address the need for information about reality of disability. A DET course will enable participants to identify and address discriminatory forms of practice towards disabled people. Through training they will find ways to challenge the organisational behaviour which reinforces negative myths and values and which prevents disabled people from gaining equality and achieving full participation in society.

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers training is done by an expert well trained team of persons with disabilities and is inclusive of all impairments and addresses definitions, an inclusive workplace, reasonable accommodation, terminology and much more!  The sessions are at least three hours, but can be up to two days (depending on the needs of the client). "Training is done in inter - actively, using multimedia and is not “heavy”!!! Training is tailor made for every sector, including:  Tourism, Tertiary Education, Banking, Mining and more."

For references, contact:

Read More: .....

Other Services: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can also supply information and assist with a variety of other Services, including: audits; work placements and reasonable accommodation; internships and training; entrepreneurs with disabilities; disability information and children’s programmes; referrals of persons with disabilities needing our services. Contact us for more information on: Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or Email: edwina@ncpd.org.za or read the article below about the Fund Raising Partnerships that the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities are involved in.

Read More: .....

Fund Raising PartnershipsCasual Day

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities organize and run a number of fun raising projects to help raise funds including "Casual Day" and the "Nappy Run":
( Click image on the right to enlarge. )

"Casual Day: is South Africa’s leading fundraising & awareness campaign for persons with disabilities and is the flagship project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD). Casual Day was launched in 1995 and is an awareness and fundraising campaign benefiting persons with disabilities. Each year on the first Friday of September, South Africans are encouraged to go to work or school dressed differently and to wear the official Casual Day sticker to show their support for persons with disabilities."

Read More: ......

"Nappy Run: is a 5km Fun Run which takes place at the Joburg Zoo every year coinciding with National Children’s Day, the purpose of the Nappy Run™ campaign is to educate the public on the violation of rights of our country’s most marginalized and vulnerable group of people – children with disabilities and to appeal to the public for online donations which go towards the purchase of nappies for children with disabilities.

The event is organised by the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and forms part of the NCPD’s observation of South Africa’s Disability Rights Awareness Month (DRAM) in November. The Nappy Run campaign runs until 3 December to coincide with the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), while DRAM also culminates on that same day. For more information about the Nappy Run™ fun run, or to make a donation, visit www.nappyrun.org.za, or find them on Facebook - on Facebook - @Nappyrun.sa | Instagram - @Nappyrun.sa |Twitter - @NappyRun. Alternatively, email: info@nappyrun.org.za."

Read More: .....

Champion Of Hope

Champion of Hope is a Non Profit organization of and for Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV Aids Virus in the Pixley ka Seme Region in the Northern Cape. At Champion of Hope we believe in the abilities of Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV/Aids Virus and choose to focus on the positives and therefore develop our clients through Skills Development and Skills Training.Champion Of Hope

Our main objective is to assist People Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired and those affected and infected with the HIV/ Aids Virus who has low skills and high poverty levels to reach their true potential in life and in this way to lobby a living wage for themselves.

Our full list of services includes: Skills Development & Skills Training; Economic Empowerment; Income Generation; Job Creation; Job Placement; Sports Development & Sports Training; Fundraising; Awareness & Promotion; Accessibility & Mobility; Women’s Programs; Youth Programs; Children’s Programs; Early Childhood Development Programs; Support Groups; Social Clubs & Book Clubs and Mini  Libraries for the Sight Impaired in collaboration with Department of Sports, Arts and Culture.

You can contact Esme Fourie T/A Champion Of Hope (102 - 568 - NPO) at nr 80 Mainstreet De Aar 7000 or via Mobile: 078 886 7902 • Fax: 086 587 4779/ Whatsapp: 0657008851 or Email: infocoh949@gmail.com

2. Diagnostic Focused Organizations

Diagnostic-focused organizations are those DPO's such as the Diagnostic-focused organizations which represent a medical diagnostic group such as the SA Federation for Mental Health (SAFMH) and Down Syndrome South Africa.

The South African Mental Health Advocacy Movement (SAMHAM)

The South African Mental Health Advocacy Movement (SAMHAM) was established by the SA Federation for Mental Health (SAFMH) in 2007 in recognition of the importance of giving persons with psychosocial and intellectual disabilities a voice, and further recognising that they are ultimately the experts in mental health and should thus always be key partners among all stakeholders within the mental health sector. Outside of the mental health field and within communities, persons with psychosocial and intellectual disabilities must be empowered to participate at all levels of their lives.

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Down Syndrome South Africa

Down Syndrome South Africa is the National Umbrella Body of all Down Syndrome associations across South Africa and currently have eight branches, one support group and four outreaches in most of the major centres of the country. Down Syndrome South Africa a non-profit organisation which is made up of people with Down syndrome, their families and interested persons working to improve the quality of life for those with Down syndrome by:

  • Advocacy and lobbying to parliament, government etc on the rights of persons with Down syndrome and other intellectual disabilities
  • Developing and dissemination of updated information through various forms of media
  • Raising Awareness
  • Promoting World and National Down Syndrome Day annually
  • Capacity building of our members
  • Training on:
    • New Parent Support and Basic Counseling
    • Early Intervention - What you need to know
    • Inclusive Education
    • Self Advocacy
    • Job Coaching.

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3. Provincial Organizations

Within these DPOs such as Down Syndrome South Africa which represent medical diagnostic groups, are provincial organizations to assist it's members in a particular province, such as:

Down Syndrome Association Western Cape (DSAWC): is a non profit organization that provide support to people with Down syndrome and their families in the Western Cape. "Our aim is to improve quality of life and to develop and refine skills so that people with Down syndrome can contribute to their communities. We support our members through counseling, education, early intervention and sharing of information regarding medical aspects, employment and civil rights."

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3. Population-specific Organizations

Population-specific organizations, represent a population group such as children with disabilities, an example of this is:

The Sunshine Association: which is a dynamic, progressive and innovative non-profit organisation in the field of intellectual disability, offering diverse services at many levels. All developments and services offered by the organisation are a direct response to the needs identified in the communities. The Sunshine Centre Association is committed to the development and inclusion of children with disabilities and delays intellectual, developmental, and physical in partnership with families and communities.

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Sports Organizations

There are also a wide variety of Sports Organizations, including the:

  1. International organizations such as the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), International Sports Federation for Persons with Intellectual Disability (INAS-FID) and Special Olympics World Games.
  2. National sports organizations that govern abeld bodied sports, as well as some disability sports, such as The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC)
  3. Special Olympics South Africa, which govern Special Olympics sports in South Africa.
  4. Provincial Sports Associations & Sports Clubs which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa.

International Paralympic Committee (IPC)

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) is the global governing body of the Paralympic Movement. Its purpose is to organise the Summer and Winter Paralympic Games and act as the International Federation for ten sports, supervising and coordinating World Championships and other competitions. For a time, athletes with intellectual disabilities were included in the Paralympic Games. After a cheating scandal at the 2000 Summer Paralympics, where a number of athletes participating in intellectual disability events were revealed to not be disabled, INAS-FID athletes were banned from Paralympics competition, but the ban on intellectually disabled athletes has since been lifted, but the number of events for people with intellectual disabilities are far less than other disabilities.

The vision of the IPC, run by 200 members, is ‘To enable Para athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world.’

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International Sports Federation for Persons with Intellectual Disability (INAS-FID)

INAS (International Sports Federation for Persons with Intellectual Disability; originally called INAS-FMH and later INAS-FID) was established in 1986 by professionals in the Netherlands who were involved in sport and wanted to promote the participation of athletes with mental handicap in elite sport.

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Special Olympics

Special Olympics World Games are held every two years, alternating with Summer and Winter Games. The last Special Olympics World Games was on the 25th July to 2nd August 2015 in Los Angeles, California, USA.

In addition to the World Games, Special Olympics holds competitions at the local, state/province, country, region and world level every year. In all, more than 70,000 Special Olympics competitions are held every year. South Africa takes part in this.

To be eligible to participate in Special Olympics, you must be at least 8 years old and identified by an agency or professional as having one of the following conditions:

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Special Olympics South Africa

Special Olympics South Africa is home to more than 45 000 talented athletes trained in 18 competitive sports. We provide year-round training for men, women and children with intellectual disabilities. Our goal is to transform their lives through the joy of sport, and to transform the lives of their families and communities. The global mission of Special Olympics is to provide year-round sports training and athletic competition in a variety of Olympic-type sports for children and adults with intellectual disabilities.

We provide continuing opportunities to develop physical fitness, demonstrate courage, experience joy and participate in a sharing of gifts, skills and friendship with families, other Special Olympics athletes and the community.

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2. The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC)

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) is the National Olympic Committee (NOC) and National Paralympic Committee (NPC) for South Africa, and are the responsible body for South Africa at the CommonwealthSASCOC Games. SASCOC is also responsible for high-performance sport in the country and coordinates the relationship with various international sports federations. They not only help look after all our various National Federations who are affiliated to them, but are responsible for awarding National Protea Colours to athletes who have met the criteria to represent South Africa in different sporting codes, including:

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4. Provincial Sports Associations & Sports ClubsDifferently Abled Cricket Club

There are various Provincial Sports Associations & Sports Clubs that are also available, which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa, these Provincial Sports Associations & clubs may include "Disabled" and Abled Body athletes or just "Disabled" athletes, they include:

The Differently Abled Cricket Club: which is an open cricket club for the differently abledcricket players, which includes the Blind, Deaf, Intellectually Impaired (SID and MID) and Physically Disabled. "We are the only club of this kind in South Africa and we would like to make it our goal in getting other regions to follow suit! "

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If you would like to find out more about these & other Sports Organizations or the sports that are available for you, you can visit our Sports Page:http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/intellectual-impairments/sports-for-intellectually-impaired/.

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government or any Organization. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

Gold Level Advert
National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities
 Differently Abled Cricket Club (DACC)
Champion Of Hope

Organizations

Service Providers

Organizations

To view the Organizations available for your Disability in your area, click the button to the right.
To view the Services that are available which some Organizations provide, click the button on the left.

View Organizations available for your disability, click here.

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

Since the International Year of Disabled Persons in 1981, persons with disabilities have organized themselves into their own organizations all over the world, these organizations are sometimes called Disabled People's Organizations or DPOs. DPO's are those controlled by a majority of persons with disabilities (51%) at the board and membership levels. The role of these organizations includes providing a voice of their own, identifying needs, expressing views on priorities, evaluating services and advocating change and public awareness. Some Organizations also provide or sell equipment.

DPOs believe that persons with disabilities are their own best spokespersons and their role has been and is fundamental for the human rights movement of persons with disabilities. There are a variety of different types of disability groups that have there own organizations & these include persons with Mobility Impairments.

Types Of Disability Organizations In South Africa

There are a wide range of advocacy and self-help organization which exist in South Africa. They include organizations such as the overtly political Disabled People South Africa, aligned with the ruling African National Congress, the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope, as well as single-issue national organizations such as the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) and then there are organisations that offer specific products or services such as Sports (SASAPD) or Accommodation (Cheshire Home), to name just a few.

There are 4 main types of Disability organizations in South Africa:

  1. Cross-disability organizations, such as the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope, which represents the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa.
  2. Diagnostic-focused organizations, such as the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), which represents a medical diagnostic group, such as Quadriplegics and Paraplegics.
  3. Population-specific organizations, such as Disabled Women South Africa, which represent a population group, such as Women with disabilities.
  4. Service Specific Organisations, are Organisations that offer specific products or services such (SASAPD, which is in charge of sports for persons with disabilities in South Africa) or Accommodation (Cheshire Homes - which is an international organisation, but has organisations and homes in different provinces)

1. Cross Disability Organizations

Cross-disability organizations represent the interests of all persons with disabilities in South Africa, and include the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and Champion Of Hope.

National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD)

The NCPD is a NGO with a footprint throughout South Africa that plays a lobbying & advocacy role when it comes to the rights of persons with disabilities. "We're an umbrella body coordinating the advancement of the rights of persons with physical disabilities in accordance with the White Paper on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and more. We have nine provincial Associations for Persons with Disabilities with numerous projects and branches that focus on rural development as well as social."NCPD

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities does advocacy work and services leading to an equitable and inclusive society. "We are affiliated to the South African Disability Alliance, as well as Rehabilitation International. Our programmes cover the whole of South Africa."

Services

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offer a wide variety of different Services, which include:

Workplace Policy & Disability Equity Training: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities offers Disability Equality Training courses to address the need for information about the reality of disability. Training is tailor made for every sector, including: Tourism, Tertiary Education, Banking, Mining and more. Through training they will find ways to challenge the organizational behavior which reinforces negative myths and values and which prevents disabled people from gaining equality and achieving full participation in society. Training is done by an expert well trained team of persons with disabilities.

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Beach Permits: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities in partnership with the Department of Environmental Services, offers persons with severe physical Mobility Impairments the opportunity to gain access to certain beaches, by obtaining a permit from DEAT.

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Job Placement & Skills Development: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities have programs in place that aid persons with disabilities, to find jobs & acquire skills that they my need in the workplace. "We offer BBBEE advice and services related to persons with disabilities, including: Job placement, Skills development, Preferential procurement, Ownership and supply chain development."

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Motor Vehicle Importation Rebate: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can assist you to apply for a Rebate on a new vehicle that has been imported and has been or will be adapted to suite you and your disability.

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Universal Design & Access: Persons with disabilities are often excluded from many Events, Services, Information, Communication, Products and Venues, due to all users not considered during the planning phases. The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can assist to prevent this from happening by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase.

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Parking Discs: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can also supply information and assist with registering and applying for a Disabled Parking Disk, so that you will be able to park in a Disabled Parking space if you qualify.

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Children With Disabilities: Our work in respect of children with disabilities focuses on addressing rights violations and promoting their rights, all with the aim of and to contribute to an improved dispensation for this most vulnerable and exposed group of people in our country. Rights violations and advancing the rights of children with disabilities are addressed through advocacy, lobbying and public education and awareness raising.

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Raising Awareness: Living in an age where information is for the most part a click away to a large part of society, should mean that persons with disabilities enjoy all their non-disabled counterparts do, but despite democracy and the information age, persons with disabilities often still find themselves on the side-line when it comes to securing employment or even just having access to enjoy a sports match or theatre production. The need for raising awareness of impairment, disability and related matters, we aim to raise the level of awareness about disability related issues through various initiatives.

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Rural Development: We go to certain areas to ascertain if the information we have on-hand is correct and/or to be up-to-date with the current situation in those areas. The same goes for projects but with projects we also need to see how sustainable these projects are and if they need assistance to either stay the course or change the project toward better outcomes for the participants and beneficiaries of these projects.

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The Dispatch Arts Project: The Dispatch Arts Project is an arts and culture development project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities and is sponsored by the National Lotteries Commission. The project’s aim is to facilitate the inclusion and participation of persons with disabilities in all aspects of community life in South Africa. It is a platform through which rural artists with disabilities can showcase their talents and handicrafts and make a decent living in the process.

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Training: The NCPD is proud to be in a position to offer various SETA accredited training courses ( short course, learnerships and internships) together with corporate partners whom then get their BBBEE POINTS for the DTI scorecard. We also do short training of Professionals in the Services and Health profession , for which these professionals get CPD points. The courses for architects, and other professionals is not accredited for CPD points. Other training includes Caregiver training for carers of children or adults; Governance training; Fundraising training; Disability Equity training; Reasonable accommodation; Inclusive design; Various impairments and the implications; Drivers of persons with disabilities; Human Rights and advocacy; Assistive device repairs & Transport and driving training. The majority of training sessions can be tailor-made to suit your needs.

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Other Services: The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities can also supply information and assist with a variety of other Services, including: Audits; Work placements and reasonable accommodation; Internships and training; Entrepreneurs with disabilities; Disability information and children’s programmes; Fund Raising and Referrals of persons with disabilities needing our services. Contact us for more information on: Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or Email: edwina@ncpd.org.za or read the article below about the Fund Raising Partnerships that the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities are involved in.

Fund Raising PartnershipsCasual Day

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities organize and run a number of fun raising projects to help raise funds including "Casual Day" and the "Nappy Run": ( Click image on the right to enlarge. )

"Casual Day: is South Africa’s leading fundraising & awareness campaign for persons with disabilities and is the flagship project of the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD). Casual Day was launched in 1995 and is an awareness and fundraising campaign benefiting persons with disabilities. Each year on the first Friday of September, South Africans are encouraged to go to work or school dressed differently and to wear the official Casual Day sticker to show their support for persons with disabilities."

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"Nappy Run: is a 5km Fun Run which takes place at the Joburg Zoo every year coinciding with National Children’s Day, the purpose of the Nappy Run™ campaign is to educate the public on the violation of rights of our country’s most marginalized and vulnerable group of people – children with disabilities and to appeal to the public for online donations which go towards the purchase of nappies for children with disabilities.

The event is organised by the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) and forms part of the NCPD’s observation of South Africa’s Disability Rights Awareness Month (DRAM) in November. The Nappy Run campaign runs until 3 December to coincide with the International Day of Persons with Disabilities (IDPD), while DRAM also culminates on that same day. For more information about the Nappy Run™ fun run, or to make a donation, visit www.nappyrun.org.za, or find them on Facebook - @Nappyrun.sa | Instagram - @Nappyrun.sa |Twitter - @NappyRun. Alternatively, email them on: info@nappyrun.org.za."

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Champion Of Hope

Champion of Hope is a Non Profit organization of and for Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV Aids Virus in the Pixley ka Seme Region in the Northern Cape. At Champion of Hope we believe in the abilities of Persons Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired as well as those affected and infected by the HIV/Aids Virus and choose to focus on the positives and therefore develop our clients through Skills Development and Skills Training.Champion Of Hope

Our main objective is to assist People Living with Disabilities and the Hearing Impaired and those affected and infected with the HIV/ Aids Virus who has low skills and high poverty levels to reach their true potential in life and in this way to lobby a living wage for themselves.

Our full list of services includes: Skills Development & Skills Training; Economic Empowerment; Income Generation; Job Creation; Job Placement; Sports Development & Sports Training; Fundraising; Awareness & Promotion; Accessibility & Mobility; Women’s Programs; Youth Programs; Children’s Programs; Early Childhood Development Programs; Support Groups; Social Clubs & Book Clubs and Mini  Libraries for the Sight Impaired in collaboration with Department of Sports, Arts and Culture.

You can contact Esme Fourie T/A Champion Of Hope (102 - 568 - NPO) at nr 80 Mainstreet De Aar 7000 or via Mobile: 078 886 7902 • Fax: 086 587 4779/ Whatsapp: 0657008851 or Email: infocoh949@gmail.com

2. Diagnostic Focused Organizations

Diagnostic-focused organizations, such as the QuadPara Association of South Africa represent a medical diagnostic group, such as Quadriplegics and Paraplegics.

QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA)

The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) is a non-profit organisation (NPO 000-881) of Quadriplegics and Paraplegics in South Africa. QASA’s mission is to be an effective “co-ordinating, policy-making and supporting organisation striving to prevent spinal cord injury and to improve the lives of quadriplegics and paraplegics by securing resources to advocate, educate, capacitate, support and mobilise.”QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA)

QASA is a member of the South Africa Disability Alliance (SADA) and has significant relationships with other such organisations, such as the Department of Social Development, the Chris Burger Petro Jackson Players Fund and the National Council for Persons with Physical Disabilities in South Africa (NCPD).

QASA now has six regions and has provincial organizations within QASA, which are able to assist it's members in a particular province. Six Regional Associations are affiliated to QASA: Gauteng South, Gauteng North, Eastern Cape, Western Cape, North West and KwaZulu-Natal. The QASA Management Board is made up of representatives of each Regional Association.

QASA run a number of Projects and Services which include: Advocacy & lobbying; Conducting awareness campaigns on the cause and prevention of spinal cord injury;  Publication and distribution of information on disability rights; Rural outreach; Developing social enterprises to sustain individuals and Regional Associations; Providing sport and hobby activities; driver training in adapted vehicles, Provision of transport, Provision of education bursaries and facilitating skills development through internships, Computer training, Consulting, Disability sensitizing and workshops.

QASA is sustained by strategic relationships with corporates, social enterprise, the National Lottery Commission and a number of campaigns & events. Some of QASA’s projects generate revenue which services the essential non-revenue generating projects.

Read the article below to find out more about these Projects and Services that QASA run or visit their website at www.qasa.co.za.

QASA Projects & Services

Beach Wheelchairs: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), through the kind sponsorship from Approved Auto and the Rotary Club of Kloof has placed 2 ‘beach wheelchairs’ at Durban beachfront locations. Another 2 ‘beach wheelchairs’ are placed at Granny’s Pool, Southbroom.

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SABAT Battery: SABAT sponsors every QASA member with an electric wheelchair, one set of batteries each year. The battery project is a partnership between QASA and SABAT which has been in operation since July 2003. This project has ensured that thousands of quadriplegics and paraplegics remain mobile.

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Wheelchair Fund: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) have a Wheelchair Fund and provides Wheelchairs, Seating, Assistive Devices and Mobility Aids for people who need specialised seating and wheelchair requirements. Members apply, are assessed and are awarded wheelchairs to suit their mobility need, therefor ensuring that members are as mobile and functional as possible. QASA also provides peer support as part of our empowerment responsibilities, batteries for Quadriplegics using power wheelchairs, and various publications.

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Self Help Centres: One of the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) main focus areas is promoting independent living for quadriplegics and paraplegics. With limited access to education and the formal labour market, and in many cases reliant on the government’s disability grant, quadriplegics and paraplegics are often left with little choice but to be dependent on family members for a home. QASA’s solution is to provide self help centre’s which allow communities of wheelchair users to live independently of their families. The self help centre’s provide accommodation, meals, care attendants and transport to the residents.

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Wheelchair Parking Bays & Disks: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) provides Parking Disks to persons who use wheelchairs, so that they can easily transfer in and out of their vehicle at shopping centres etc. by using the extra space that the wheelchair parking bays provide. You can apply to, to register and receive a disabled parking disc from QASA, if you are using a wheelchair on a temporary or permanent bases.

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Conducting Awareness Campaigns: QASA Conducts various Awareness Campaigns and prevention programmes which aim to prevent future injuries by simply making the public aware of simplest things, these prevention programmes include the "Diving Prevention Campaign" & "Buckle Up"' - "We Don’t Want New Members". QASA also does awareness talks at school and have a strong relationship with the Chris Burger Petro Jackson Players Fund.

1. Diving Prevention Program: QASA produced a DVD warning of the dangers of diving, which is a major cause of spinal cord injury.

2. Chris Burger Petro Jackson Players Fund: QASA has a strong relationship with the Chris Burger Petro Jackson Players Fund. The Chris Burger Petro Jackson Players Fund assists all spinal cord injured persons, who have injured themselves playing sport. Furthermore, they promote the wellness of rugby and prevention of spinal cord injury in rugby.

2. Buckle Up: "We Don’t Want New Members": Is a road safety campaign aimed at getting motorists to use their seatbelts.

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Sports Fund - Providing Sport & Hobby Activities: QASA staunchly supports all disabled sports initiatives in South Africa. To this end, QASA has set up a Sports Fund, to which any QASA member can apply for financial assistance for a sporting activity. The Sports Fund has also supported participants in quadriplegic rugby, the SABAT Power Wheelchair Race, the Outeniqua Challenge wheelchair race, table tennis, dancing and darts.

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Employment Project: QASA aims to improve the participation of persons with disabilities by providing them with employment opportunities. In addition, QASA encourages positive changes in the perception and attitudes toward disabilities within the corporate sector. At present QASA’s “Employment Project” is the driving force to support people with disabilities into the workforce and maximize their opportunity to be identified and placed. QASA’s Employment Project activities involve building an, updated and comprehensive database of people with disabilities and their skills.

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Work Readiness Programme: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) have launched the Work Readiness Programme which is being offered in three centres in South Africa, they are hosted by QAGN in Pretoria and QAWC in Durbanville as well as at the Victor Daitx Training Centre which is on the property of the QASA office in Gillitts. The Work Readiness Programme bridges the gap to employment for our Members who are Quadriplegics and Paraplegics.

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Provision Of Transport: QASA has vehicles with adaptations necessary to allow persons with disabilities the opportunity of car hire during their travels. 

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The David Lewis Lodge: The David Lewis Lodge is a guest Lodge facility owned by QASA which is situated in Edenvale, Johannesburg and provides accessible accommodation for wheelchair users.

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Universal Design & Access: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) can assist with various issues relating to Universal Design & Access. The National Access Authority (NAA) provides a policing and advisory service for access issues and deals with access complaints and transgressions of the National Building Regulations. By promoting an accessible environment and taking to task, abuse of human rights, this project has ensured more accessible environments and promoted the concept of Universal design.

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Disability Sensitizing And Workshops: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) provide sensitization training to corporates and Government, in order to deal with prejudices and inequalities towards disability and change mind sets and create opportunities for people with disabilities to integrate. Training is also given regularly to the service providers to airlines on the safe and appropriate handling of assisted passengers, thus developing a better service for assisted passengers who travel. These projects have a revenue stream for QASA.

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Bags Of Hope: QASA provides assistance for people leaving hospital after sustaining spinal cord injuries, by providing them with useful information and products. When somebody sustains a spinal cord injury (SCI), they will need anything from three months to a couple of years of rehabilitation in a hospital before they are ready to go back into normal life. This rehabilitation will teach the person how to manage the physical aspects of their disability, such as bladder and bowel function, use of a wheelchair and other assistive devices, and pressure care, as well as giving them resources to address issues such as independent living, employment and sexual options.

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Care Attendant Training Courses: Through QASA and the Momentum National Care Attendant Training Courses, QASA aims to prevent pressure sores to residents in Self Help Centres & give formal training about pressure sores and the general care of paraplegics and quadriplegics.

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Education Fund: One of QASA’s main areas of focus is that of developing the skills and thereby the employment potential of people with disabilities. Historically, people with disabilities have been prevented from gaining basic and further qualifications through physical and attitudinal barriers to access to such opportunities. QASA has a number of initiatives to tackle these barriers and provide opportunities for people with disabilities to gain skills and qualifications, these include the provision of education bursaries and facilitating skills development through internships; Employment Support through learnerships and promoting small businesses owned by persons with disabilities.

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Publication & Distribution of Information on Disability Rights: The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) are involved in and provide a number of publications that supply information essential for persons with disabilities, these include:

  • Rolling Inspiration Magazine: A bi-monthly lifestyle magazine for people with mobility impairments.
  • A-Z Guide: A glossy insert to Rolling Inspiration magazine providing information about all products and suppliers in the disability sector.
  • Automobility: A glossy insert to Rolling Inspiration magazine providing information about vehicles and vehicle adaptations.
  • Sawubona Disability: A publication in five languages (English, Afrikaans, Sotho, Xhosa, Zulu), covering the myths, manners, dos and don’ts about disability.
  • Sexuality and Sex options for Spinal cord injured: A publication presenting the opportunities for sexual options and sexuality issues, also covering issues of HIV/AIDS.
  • SCI for Illiterate persons: This publication explains spinal cord injury in pictorial form to assist people who are illiterate.
  • SCI information booklet: This publication, explains spinal cord injury for all to understand. To ensure that all people with spinal cord injury and their families have a good understanding of the condition.

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Driver Training In Adapted Vehicles: One of the biggest obstacles that many Persons with Mobility Impairments often encounter, is getting their independence back and being able to drive a vehicle. Driving Ambitions Driving School gives persons with physical disabilities who have the agility to drive, the opportunity to take driving lessons with the objective of getting their driving licence, thus giving the independence back to many Persons With Disabilities. The Driving Ambitions Driving School is managed with the assistance from Rolling Rehab, under contract to the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA). It comprises of adapted vehicles in Johannesburg, Pretoria and Durban, with professional driver trainers. Visit the YouTube video clip on the right to see one of the vehicles which is used and is appropriate for persons who would like to learn to drive from their wheelchair.

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Rolling Rehab

Rolling Rehab is run by Occupational Therapist Caroline Rule seen in the video above. They offer an independent consultancy service where they do a holistic assessment of the individual’s needs and abilities, and advise whether they are safe to start driving or to continue driving after an accident or illness which may have affected their ability to adequately control a vehicle. Each assessment is customized according to the client’s needs and include:Rolling Rehab

Rolling Rehab makes recommendations on what vehicles and adaptations are best suited to their clients needs, as well as running regularly workshops for therapists and driving instructors who want to improve their knowledge about driving adaptations and the effects of disability on driving ability. To find out more, visit: Rolling Rehab - Workshops

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QASA Provincial Organizations

QASA now has six regions and has provincial organizations within QASA, which are able to assist it's members in a particular province. The Six Regional Associations are affiliated to QASA and the QASA Management Board is made up of representatives of each Regional Association including: 

The QuadPara Association of the Western Cape (QAWC): which is a non-profit organisation and represents quadriplegics and paraplegics in the Western Cape. Any person may become a member of the organisation and the QAWC membership is drawn from various diverse areas across the Western Cape. The organisation is managed by a management committee and has two representatives on the management committee of the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), under whose jurisdiction QAWC falls. In addition to this, QAWC has a working relationship with APD Western Cape, are represented on the executive committee of the Western Cape Network on Disability as well and on the facility board of the Western Cape Rehabilitation Centre, the hospital that caters specifically for wheelchair users.

QAWC strives to improve the lives of and fights for the rights of quadriplegics and paraplegics in the Western Cape. Through prevention and awareness campaigns, QAWC aims to prevent spinal cord injuries as well as educate the general public about the realities of living with a spinal cord injury. In addition to this QAWC also provide a number of other projects and services for quadriplegics and paraplegics in the Western Cape.

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3. Population Specific Organizations

Population-specific, such DPOs represent a population group, such as Disabled Women South Africa.

Disabled Women South Africa

Disabled Women South Africa is a mass women formation of DPSA, it promotes equalization of opportunities in all spheres of life for all disabled women. It champions the general interests and rights of Disabled women in socio-economic and political life of the country and promotes gender equality amongst the non-disabled and disabled people in general as well as the empowerment of disabled women.

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4. Service Specific Organisations

"Service Specific Organisations" are those Organisations that offer specific products or services such as SASAPD, which is in charge of various sports for persons with disabilities in South Africa or Cheshire Homes, which is an international organisation that now has more than 500 service centres in 57 countries around the world, including 16 Cheshire Homes Centres in South Africa, and three in Gauteng, including the Ann Harding Cheshire Home in Northwold in Johannesburg.

Ann Harding Cheshire Homes

The Ann Harding Cheshire Home was established over 30 years ago following the donation of the grounds by Ben Harding, whose mother, Ann was disabled - hence the name Ann Harding Cheshire Home. Cheshire Homes are structured around communityAnn Harding Cheshire Home needs and local communities, they recognise the needs relating to persons with disabilities and have homes in different provinces. These facilities are suitably equipped and offer accommodation with  24 hour care.

 

 

The Ann Harding Cheshire Home is a registered Non-Profit Organisation for the care, education, training and development of persons with physical disabilities of all races and religions. Ann Harding Cheshire Homes was opened in 1976 in a house and land donated by the Council.  The house, which is now the Charity Shop, was only large enough to house eight Residents, and even that was tight.

Development of the surrounding land only took place much later, and in 1988 a building to house 40 Residents was opened. The Home is named after the physically disabled mother of one Benjamin Charles Harding who originally donated property for the Home which proved unsuitable for development. This property was sold, and the money used to develop the current land.

Primary Services

Ann Harding Cheshire Home

Image Courtesy of Ann Harding Cheshire Home

We provide our Residents, all of whom live here permanently, with comfortable accommodation, 24 hour care, nutritious meals, laundry, access to therapists and social worker as well as physiotherapists, state clinics and hospitals and private practitioners using our own specially adapted vehicles. The majority of our 40 residents have taken up permanent residence having suffered from, and becoming permanently disabled. A wide variety of daily activities keeps our Residents motivated and educated. The more popular ones are arts and crafts, painting, bingo, chess and card games. More recently (2014), we have upgraded our swimming pool, which is now a heated therapy pool. Residents are enjoying spending time in the pool with our full-time Occupational Therapist, as well a private Physiotherapists.

Ann Harding Cheshire Home has a committee of dedicated members who ensure exemplary ethics and code of conduct, and that any funds received are used for the intended purpose. Monthly reports detail the progress made in the utilisation of all donations, sponsorships and bequests made.

Ann Harding Home is run like a business, with the care and advancement of our residents the first priority. The residents themselves have a significant say in the running of the home, through the Residents' Committee, which is fully represented on the Home Management Committee. The Home is registered as a PBO, and can therefore offer Section 18a certificates for tax purposes.

Cheshire Homes Indepedent Living

Image Courtesy of Ann Harding Cheshire Home: Independent Living for persons with mobility impairments

For capital projects we offer naming rights, which bring the prestige of being associated with a long-standing NGO in the community. Our donors are proud to be associated with us, because of our good reputation and transparency. We are in good standing with the local media, schools and businesses in the community, and have the privilege of being supported by numerous volunteers from all walks of life. We prefer to build long-term, mutually beneficial partnerships that deliver significant benefits to disabled people and the stakeholders of a business alike.

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Future Plans

Future plans include further development on Ann Harding Land, whereby the vision is to build:

  • A subacute step-down facility for physically disabled adults
  • Twenty two 2 bedroom, 2 bathroom, Independent Living Units for persons with physical disabilities, and a Caregiver or family member. (See image to the right or the following link: Independent Living for persons with mobility impairments.)
  • A Skills Development Centre to cater for all three homes in Johannesburg, as well as the surrounding community

Sustainability

In addition to applying for funding, Ann Harding also hold a number of fundraising events each year. These are always very successful and assist enormously with costs. We also run a very successful Charity Shop, which is well supported by the local community. Long term plans include building self-living units, which will be sold on a life-rights basis. The Home has a hall which is hired out to companies for meetings, training courses etc.

 

Cheshire Homes - Independent Living Facility For Persons With Mobility Impairments

Cheshire Homes - Independent Living Facility For Persons With Mobility Impairments. Image supplied courtesy of Cheshire Homes

Contact Us

The best way to assess our services is to visit our Home, and we welcome such visits. The Home is a warm, homely place, with beautiful gardens and a swimming pool. Common areas include lounges, tea areas, a computer room, therapy room and dining area.  Above all, we are always cognisant of the fact that this is the residents’ home, and their comfort is foremost in our minds. Should you have any queries, or require further information, please do not hesitate to contact us on the details below:

Ann Harding Cheshire Home: Contact Jackie Kyle (Fundraising Manager) on: 011 792 3510 or 082 764 0973, or via Email: Jackie@cheshirehomes.org.za Website: www.annhardingcheshirehome.org.za. Physical Address: Plot 40, 4th Road, Northwold, 2155. Registration No’s: 020-102-NPO; PBO 18/11/13/4017 Bank Details: Ann Harding Cheshire Home, First National Bank, Northgate Branch Branch Code: 256755, Acc no: 50410145574.

To find an organization that can assist you, visit our "Organization" Search Facility on the following link: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/disability-organizations/

Sports Organizations

There are also a wide variety of Sports Organizations, including:

  1. International organizations such as the International Paralympic Committee
  2. National sports organizations that govern abeld bodied sports, as well as some disability sports, such as The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC).
  3. South African Sports Association for Physically Disabled (SASAPD), which govern some physically disabled sports.
  4. Provincial Sports organizations, such as The Free State Sport Association for the Physically Disabled & Visually Impaired.
  5. Sports Club Organizations, which offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa.

1. International Paralympic Committee

The International Paralympic Committee (IPC) is the global governing body of the Paralympic Movement. Its purpose is to organise the Summer and Winter Paralympic Games and act as the International Federation for ten sports, supervising and coordinating World Championships and other competitions.

The vision of the IPC, run by 200 members, is ‘To enable Para athletes to achieve sporting excellence and inspire and excite the world.’

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2. The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC)

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) is the National Olympic Committee (NOC) and National Paralympic Committee (NPC) for South Africa, and are the responsible body for South Africa at the Commonwealth Games. SASCOC is also responsible for high-performance sport in the country and coordinates the relationship with various international sports federations. They not only help look after all our various National Federations who are affiliated to them, but are also responsible for awarding National Protea Colours to athletes who have met the criteria to represent South Africa in different sporting codes, including:

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3. The South African Sports Association for Physically Disabled (SASAPD)

 The South African Sports Association for Physically Disabled ( SASAPD) was established in 1962 and focuses on the development and promotion of the sporting codes offered at Paralympic level for athletes with Physical Disabilities, Visual Impairments and blindness.

They offer pathways for qualification towards Paralympic Games across a variety of sports, through their affiliations with international bodies such as: IBSA, IWAS, CPISRA and The Nedbank National Championships for Physically Disabled. They also work and are an affiliate member of SASCOC as well as being associated members of a number of other national sporting federations.

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4. Provincial Sports Associations

There are also many Provincial Sports Associations that govern a variety sports in a particular province in South Africa, such as The Free State Sport Association for the Physically Disabled & Visually Impaired. 

The Free State Sport Association for the Physically Disabled and Visually Impaired: have a sound understanding and passion to build character through sport. "Our executive has years of experience working with the disabled in sport and other social environments. We have an in-depth understanding of our sport codes and the special classification criteria that is associated with each code."

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5. Sports Club OrganizationsDifferently Abled Cricket Club

Some Sports Club Organizations are also available and offer either a single or a variety of sports in a particular province or city in South Africa, these clubs may include "Disabled" and Abled Body athletes or just "Disabled" athletes. There are a variety of these clubs in South Africa, including:

The Differently Abled Cricket Club: which is an open cricket club for the differently abled cricket players, which includes the Blind, Deaf, Intellectually Impaired (SID and MID) and Physically Disabled. We are the only club of this kind in South Africa and we would like to make it our goal in getting other regions to follow suit! 

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To find a Sports Organization or Club that can assist you, visit our "Activities, Sports Organizations & Clubs" Search Facility on the following link: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/sports-clubs-organizations/ or visit our "Sport for Mobility Impaired" to find out more about the sports that are available for you.

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Organization. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

References

Gold Level Advert
National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities
The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA)
Rolling Rehab
Champion Of Hope
Differently Abled Cricket Club
Ann Harding Cheshire Home

Mobility Impairments

Mobility Impairments

Mobility Impairments is a category that deals with disabilities, conditions or diseases that effects a person's mobility or movement. This section not only deals with the types of disabilities or impairments that can effect ones mobility, but also the Sports & Hobbies that are available, and the Organizations, Companies, Products and Service Providers that are available to assist Persons With Mobility Impairments.

Below are the categories that are available in this section which supplies both information and contact details about these  Organizations, Companies, Products, Services and Service Providers. Click on the buttons below to view more information about these Categories, or feel free to Contact Us if you have any questions and we will point you in the right direction.

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government or any Organization. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

Thank you for visiting our website, we hope that it will be helpful, please feel free to visit our Facebook Page to leave a comment.

Parking Bays & Discs

Service Providers

Disabled Parking Bays & Discs

To view the suppliers of products that are available in your area, click the button to the right.
To view the service providers available in your area, click the button to the left.

Products & Equipment

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introductiondisabled parking bay

Wheelchair Parking Bays & Disks are for persons who use wheelchairs and drive themselves or who are transported in a vehicle. These Wheelchair Parking Bays are set aside for wheelchair users & Persons With Disabilities. They are not only close to the entrance, but are also wider than the average parking bay, they are traditionally 3500mm wide to cater for a wheelchair user who needs the extra space to enter or exit the vehicle. This extra space helps these transfers to be done safely for the wheelchair user & helps prevent the vehicle in the parking space near by from getting damaged. Persons who use these parking bays need to apply for a Wheelchair Parking Permit, also known as a "Disabled Parking Permit", "Handicapped Permit", "Disabled Placard" or "Disabled Badge", which is displayed on the vehicle upon parking it in one one of these bays.

Who Can Use These Parking Bays?

According to Section 137 of the Road Traffic Act 29 of 1989, Municipalities provide for special parking spaces for people with prescribed disabilities or persons who transport them. These parking spaces can be identified by a vertical sign showing the international symbol for disability, which is also clearly painted on the road surface. The permit allows exemption from street-parking charges in some places and is used to park within dedicated disabled parking spaces reserved for people who have satisfied requirements to receive the placard. If you have a disabled parking disc, you need to display the disc clearly in your windscreen.

The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), is adamant that if you don’t use a wheelchair, then don’t use the wheelchair parking facilities. The extra space helps : disabled parking sign

  • a wheelchair user to transfer into their wheelchair from their car.
  • The helper of a person who uses a wheelchair, to park the wheelchair next to the car so that they can lift the person from the car and place them into the wheelchair.
  • The helper of a person who uses a wheelchair, to offload a person from a kombi in a wheelchair down ramps or with a wheelchair lift.

Currently a parking disc will be issued for up to five years, after which the applicant must re-apply. These badges are standardized to facilitate recognition and to avoid difficulties at local level. Since 2000, all general disabled parking permits have a common style and blue colour, leading to the officially-used designation “Blue Badge”. Temporary discs are also issued for short-term disabilities (three to nine months), but the same process has to be followed.

If you are a visitor to South Africa & have an international disabled parking permit, this would be acceptable to use for a period up to a month, but if a visitor is staying for more than a month, they should apply for a temporary disabled parking permit.

How do you apply?

There are a number of Organizations that you can apply to, to register and receive a disabled parking disc, these include the National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD), the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) and an APD in your province. Each province has different procedures with regards to the application for parking permits for persons with disabilities, but if you apply for your parking disk from Organizations such as QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), the disc can be used throughout South Africa.

NCPDBelow are listed the procedures that you need to follow to register a Parking Disk with The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) or QASA. If you wish to register your Disabled Parking Disc in your province and it is not listed below, we recommend that you contact your local Association for Physically Disabled (APD) for the procedures in your area.

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD) can also supply information and assist with registering and applying for a Disabled Parking Disk to be able to park in Disabled Parking space. Contact us for more information on: Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or Email: edwina@ncpd.org.za 

QASA

The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) is a non-profit organisation (NPO 000-881) of Quadriplegics and Paraplegics living in South Africa. QASA’s mission is to be an effective “co-ordinating, policy-making and supporting organisation striving to prevent spinal cord injury and to improve the lives of quadriplegics and paraplegics by securing resources to advocate, educate, capacitate, support and mobilise.”

QASA runs a number of Projects and Services and also provides Parking Disks to persons who use wheelchairs, so that they can easily transfer in and out of their vehicle at shopping centres etc. by using the extra space that the wheelchair parking bays provide. You can apply to, to register and receive a disabled parking disc from QASA, if you are using a wheelchair on a temporary or permanentQuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) bases. You will be required to fill out an application form, which will also need to be completed by your doctor confirming that your mobility is severely impaired by an ongoing physical condition, or that your mobility is temporarily but severely impaired. You will need to download the form on the link below and print it out, once it has been completed by yourself and your Doctor, you will need to e-mail it back to the QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA) on the following e-mail address: info@qasa.co.za

Once they have received your form they will consider your application and be in contact with you, once your application has been approved. Click the link below to download the form: QASA Parking Permit Application Form 2019 If you need to contact QASA, you can contact them on the following details: PO Box 2368 Pinetown 3600, 17 Hamilton Crescent, Gillitts 3610, Tel: 031 7670352 / 7670348, Fax: 031 7670584, Email: info@qasa.co.za, www.qasa.co.za

 QASA also provide Universal Design & Access services, read the article below to find out more about these Services that they provide, or visit our Organizations - QASA Page to find out more about QASA & the other Projects & Services that they provide. You can also contact them through their website at www.qasa.co.za or read the article below to find out about Accessible Features & the other companies in South Africa that can assist you.

Western Capedisabled parking permit

If you have a disability, you can apply for a disabled parking disc from your local municipality. This disc allows you to park in disability parking bays and in certain circumstances, it exempts you from parking provisions.

To qualify for a disabled parking disc in this province, you need to have a letter from your doctor confirming that your mobility is severely impaired by an ongoing mental or physical condition, or that your mobility is temporarily but severely impaired.

Some municipalities require the doctor to complete a section of the form, so the form needs to be collected beforehand. The Western Cape Government’s suggests that you contact your local traffic department to confirm whether you require a doctor’s letter or a form, click the link to download the form: QASA Western Cape Parking Permit Application Form.

Please Note: The disabled parking disc issued by any local authority may not automatically be recognised by any other local authority. Click Local Authorities, to view contact details of other municipalities in the Western Cape.

KwaZulu-Natal

In Kwazulu-Natal, the issuing of parking discs for persons with disabilities is regulated by the "The Quadraplegic Association KZN."

Drivers need to apply for an official disabled parking disc.A detailed application process  has been developed by the The Quadraplegic Association KZN.

The application procedure for an accessible parking disc is as follows:

  • All the relevant documents must be completed in full by the applicant, as well as his or her medical practitioner.
  • The application should be accompanied by a medical certificate from a registered health professional or an occupational therapist, or physio or medical doctor.
  • The applicant must then send the completed documents back to the The Quadraplegic Association KZN, with a certified copy of the applicant’s ID document.
  • The disc is registered in the applicant’s name and can be used with any vehicle.
  • Once the form has been filled in you can email it to them at: qan@mweb.co.za you can also phone them on: 031 701 7444 or 082 875 2131.

Gauteng

In Gauteng, the issuing parking discs for persons with disabilities is regulated by the Gauteng Provincial Association for Persons with Disabilities (GPAPD).

Drivers need to apply for an official disabled parking disc. A detailed application process has been developed by the GPAPD. The application procedure for an accessible parking disc is as follows:

  • Download the application form: GPAPD Application Form or contact your local Gauteng Provincial Association for Persons with Disabilities (GPAPD) to request the application forms. http://www.gpapd.org/index.php/gauteng-provincial-association-for-persons-with-disabilities-contact-us
  • All the relevant documents must be completed in full by the applicant, as well as his or her medical practitioner.
  • The application should be accompanied by a medical certificate from a registered health professional or an occupational therapist, or physio or medical doctor.
  • The applicant must then send the completed documents back to the GPAPD, with a certified copy of the applicant’s ID document.
  • The disc is registered in the applicant’s name and can be used with any vehicle.

Once the above is completed an application is lodged with GPAPD, which requires the applicant to appear before a screening panel, who then pursue the final application on behalf of the applicant, with the relevant authorities.

Address: Pallinghurst Road, Gauteng, Westcliff South Africa, Tel No: (011) 8383012  Fax No: 116465248  or 011 425 4025 or Leslie 0724 108 282.

Other Provinces

As mentioned above, if your province is not listed above, we recommend that you contact your local Association for Physically Disabled (APD) for the procedures in your area.

Abuse of wheelchair or disabled parking bays

The misuse of disabled parking permits has been identified as a major problem worldwide. It is not only a South AfricanWheelchair Parking WhatsApp Group phenomenon. Due to the escalating number of complaints from disabled motorists about their demarcated bays being used by unaccredited drivers, The QuadPara Association of SA (Qasa) has established a WhatsApp whistle-blowing facility for the public to share information on transgressions. Estimates indicate the majority of these disks are used or obtained fraudulently. The convenience of the location, often being close to the entrance areas, is the main reason why they are abused.

Abuse most often occurs with non-disabled drivers using the vehicle, plate or placard of another person who is disabled. This often occurs with family members of disabled people.

Qasa chief executive Ari Seirlis said “The specialised parking bays are designated for wheelchair users. The bays are 3500mm in width, which is designed to accommodate a wheelchair on either side of a vehicle for the purposes of exiting or entry. Bays are positioned in specific areas not only for location but to accommodate the specified width requirements.” He said Qasa did not accept excuses from people with other health challenges using their bays because they were conveniently located. “The bays are not there to save people from walking distances. They are there for wheelchair users."

A whistle blowing facility has been established by QASA to allow the general public to inform QASA when these facilities, which are so important to the rights and freedom of wheelchair users, are abused.

“If you see someone misusing a wheelchair demarcated parking bay, please take a photo which shows the vehicle registration and wheelchair parking sign clearly. WhatsApp it to 0738539675 including the location, date and time and QASA will kindly sensitize the offender."

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It is important to note that the Disabled Parking Badge does park in a loading zone but does give you other benefits.

“The placards/license plates also do not allow for parking in the loading/unloading areas of a handicap space that is already occupied by another vehicle. These areas are designated by blue crosshatch striping. This is where we see the most violations by subjects with handicap placards/license plates.”

Click on the link to find out more: Know the law regarding handicap parking privileges

The South African National Standard for Building Regulations

"Wheelchair Parking." is one of the many "Accessible Features" that the government has introduced along with certain regulations that state, how many of these "Wheelchair Parking Bays" must be available & the size of the "Wheelchair Parking Bays"

The National Building Regulations state that where there is parking available for more than 50 motor vehicles, there must  be parking facilities that accommodate disabled persons. There is also an obligation to ensure that persons with disabilities are provided with a suitable means of access from the parking area to the ground floor – or storey – of the building.

Unfortunately many buildings and businesses in South Africa still do not have adequate Disabled Parking Bays to accommodate wheelchair users. The owners of these buildings and businesses may therefore be challenged by the need to find suitable equipment, specialists and renovators familiar with accessible design issues in order to advise them and make there Parking areas accessible to persons with disabilities, especially those in wheelchairs. There are various Organizations and Companies that can assist with Universal Design and Access to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues. 

Organizations & Companies That Can Assist With Universal Design & Access

There are now various Organizations and Companies that specialize in Universal Design and Access and can advise you on how to adapt these Accessible Routes to make sure that persons with disabilities have equal rights and no loss of dignity. The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD), QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA), Bradshaw LeRoux Consulting and Inclusive Design specialize in Universal Design and Access to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues. These Organizations and Companies can assist in different ways including:NCPD Logo

The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities (NCPD): believe that this can be prevented by applying Universal Design Principals during the design phase and they therefor offer the following services to assist:

  • Workshops for architects, developers and other building professionals to develop an understanding of universal design and access.
  • Facilitating access audits for new or existing buildings; echo e-access for the natural and communication environment. Audits are followed by a report indicating shortfalls and recommendations.
  • Marketing of facilities that are accessible to persons with disabilities

Contact Fanie Swanepoel or Danie Marais for more information on Tel: +27 11 452 2774 or email them on: fanies@ncpd.org.za or danie@ncpd.org.za

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The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA): (QASA) is a non-profit organisation (NPO 000-881) of Quadriplegics and Paraplegics living in South Africa. QASA’s mission is to be an effective “co-ordinating, policy-making and supporting organisation striving to prevent spinal cord injury and to improve the lives of quadriplegics and paraplegics by securing resources to advocate, educate, capacitate, support and mobilise.”QuadPara Association of South Africa

QASA runs a number of Projects and Services and can assist with various issues relating to Universal Design & Access. The National Access Authority (NAA) provides a policing and advisory service for access issues and deals with access complaints and transgressions of the National Building Regulations. By promoting an accessible environment and taking to task, abuse of human rights, this project has ensured more accessible environments and promoted the concept of Universal design.

QASA is sustained by strategic relationships with corporates, social enterprise, the National Lottery Commission and a number of campaigns & events. Some of QASA’s projects generate revenue which services the essential non-revenue generating projects. Click on the link below to find out more about the Universal Design & Access services that they provide, or visit our Organizations - QASA Page to find out more about QASA & the other Projects & Services that they provide. You can also contact them through their website at www.qasa.co.za or read the article below to find out about Accessible Features & the other companies in South Africa that can assist you.

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Inclusive Design: is a company founded on the fundamentals of the South African Constitution and aims to serve as a driver of social inclusion for positive and effective change in the lives of people with diverse human needs. Our philosophy is guided by individual and shared needs of people and not that of special needs. Universal Design serves as a means in which to create and enhance the functionality of environments, services and products, for the widest range of users, recognizing diversity of the human condition. Inclusive Design as a company, recognises the importance of awareness raising and the dissemination of information on diversity and inclusion as an integral deliverable to achieve Universal Access and improving lives.Inclusive Design

What we do:

Inclusive Design serves as a mechanism to audit, review, design, create and advise on adaptations and/or enhancements for the functionality of environments, transport, technology, education, services and operations, and products for all users, to accommodate the full spectrum of human diversity. Inclusive Design specialises in providing practical, sensible advice on issues relating to Universal Access and works on the premise that environments, services and facilities that are accessible to people with disabilities are equitable in the eyes of the law, makes business sense, as well as being easier and more comfortable for all users, irrespective of their functional requirements.

1.    BUSINESS CONCEPT:

Inclusive Design works with clients to find viable, feasible means of incorporating universal design into their environments, services, facilities and products. In a field of consulting where amateurs are rife and claim expertise, Inclusive Design has gone to great lengths to prove their competency on an international level. Headed by a consultant who is the highest certified Universal Access Consultant in South Africa, as verified by IAAP (International Association of Access Professionals) and with a plenary of examples and experience, Inclusive Design delivers, on time with exceptionally detailed results and recommendations. We put effort into making reports and findings legible, easy to understand and implementable to enable clients to positively affect change to becoming universally accessible and inclusive.

Services:

Inclusive Design

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Universal Access Consulting:

Consulting serves to advise clients on the options, requirements and areas where Universal Access can and should be achieved. With experience and knowledge of both South African building regulations for Persons with Disabilities, supporting equality legislation and international access requirements, Inclusive Design makes for the perfect collaborator to achieve Universal Access. Our consulting services serve to impart knowledge with clients on aspects, features and implementation of Universal Access to increase awareness of the requirements of people with disabilities as well as the broader range of beneficiaries including, pregnant women, people with young children, elderly people and people with temporary disabilities or recovering from surgery.

As part of our consulting services we also offer specific research, skills transfer and mentorship related to Universal Access and assist our clients wherever possible to progress towards a viable, feasible and desirable means of implementation to achieve equality. In line with the social model of disability, our emphasis has shifted away from the concept of being ‘disability’ focused, to that of being focused on ‘Universal Access’, which acknowledges that the benefit thereof goes beyond the classification of people with disabilities. Universal Access Consulting can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)
  • systems, services and operations
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and systems
  • Policy development, reviews and updates

Universal Access Auditing:

Universal Access Consulting

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

Auditing is the examination or inspection of various aspects of the environment, service, facility or product to determine compliance with local and/or international requirements. Audits are conducted through physical inspection and are followed by reports to indicate short-falls, areas of improvement and areas of non-compliance. Universal Access Auditing is largely conducted in the built environment in South Africa, where SANS 10400 Part S (2011): Facilities for Persons with Disabilities is the deem to satisfy requirement, which is supplemented with ISO21542 in areas where more details are required or environments which are more specialised. This process is detailed, and the audit is conducted meticulously and often includes discussions with users of the facility regarding usability, which leads to a custom report with bespoke recommendations for both built infrastructure and operations.

Inclusive Design also offers companies an advantage through a proprietary Universal Access Application™ which enables large areas of the built environment to be audited in a systematic, accurate, thorough and detailed process (for example: a campus). Saving clients time and money as the UA App captures vast amounts of data, with measurements, photo evidence and SANS 10400 Part S (2011) compliance in an easy to read, tabulated format, in a matter of days. This process conventionally takes a vast number of human hours to capture, process and write-up by a highly experience UA Auditor, but with the Universal Access App™ it is simplified, quickened, accurate and unbiased. 

Universal Access Auditing can take place in numerous fields, including:

  • built environment (architecture and planning)- with the UA App™
  • systems, services and operation
  • marketing, communication and information sharing (online, print media and presentations)
  • transport and all associated and supporting infrastructure and system
  • policy and implementation plans

Universal Access Awareness:

Universal Access Audits & Reviews

Image Courtesy of Inclusive Design

The Great Father of our Nation, Nelson Mandela said that “Education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world.” It is our belief, at Inclusive Design, that by teaching principles of good design, that we can make a significant impact upon our society. It is therefore always a recommended deliverable in our work to transfer skills and educate others on Universal Design and Universal Access. The capacitation of more people with the knowledge and understanding of the value that inclusive design offers to staff, clients and society, is part of our vision and what we strive to achieve. What we term Universal Access Awareness, can be customised to the clients’ needs, and can vary from an introductory presentation to an in-depth training session on specific aspects. Universal Access cannot be achieved without at least the basic understanding of the paradigm that leads to equality.

Additional Services:

  • Disability Awareness Training (also known as Disability Awareness Training or Sensitisation)
  • Disability Specific Monitoring and Evaluation (Qualified M and E services)

Business Competitiveness:

Universal Access is a broad concept that requires understanding, application, implementation, experience and governance around various sectors, such as the built environment, services, facilities, transport, technology, regulations and more. Inclusive Design has explicit experience in Policy, Guideline and Framework writing and advising, Technical Requirement writing, Implementation Plans, Onsite Auditing, Plan Drawing Auditing, Architectural and Planning Consulting, Auditing and Consulting in the realms of Transport, Marketing and Communication, and Training. Inclusive Design is not focused on a specific area of disability, and therefore offer holistic recommendations in order to accommodate a spectrum of users, irrespective of their abilities. Inclusive Design practice good business principles, deliver on time, communicate directly with clients, and offer superior project deliverables.

If there are any questions or comments, please feel free to contact us at Inclusive Design on Tel: +27 72 027 3623 or Email: colette@inclusivedesign.co.za Cape Town (HQ) ● Pretoria (Administration), or visit our website at: www.inclusivedesign.co.za

These Organizations and Companies listed above which specialize in Universal Design and Access will follow those standards set by "The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act" to make sure that persons with disabilities are not excluded from any events, services, information, communication, products and venues due to lack of Accessible Parking Bays.

Parking Bay Regulations

There are a number of other Disabled Parking Bay Regulations, to view all the Disabled Parking Bay Regulations, see below:

4.3.1 For employee parking, at least one parking space shall be accessible for persons with disabilities.

4.3.2 In addition to the requirement of 4.3.1, where provision has been made within a building, or on the site on which such building is erected, for the parking of more than 50 motor vehicles,

  1. At least one parking space per 25 parking spaces (or part thereof) and at least 20 % of the parking spaces at rehabilitation and medical facilities shall be provided for parking of vehicles used by persons with disabilities.
  2. The parking spaces provided for vehicles used by persons with disabilities shall be of a suitable length, shall be at least of the dimensions shown in figure 2, and shall be situated on and accessed from a surface that is not steeper than 1:50.
  3. Any parking space provided for vehicles used by persons with disabilities shall be located within 50 m of an accessible entrance.
  4. Any parking space provided for vehicles used by persons with disabilities shall be clearly demarcated as being intended for the use of persons with disabilities only;
  5. Entry and routing to any parking space designated for persons with disabilities shall be provided with a clear height of at least 2,4 m and shall allow for the entry of vehicles suitable for use by wheelchair users, particularly those that have a hoist to carry the wheelchair on top of the car.

4.3.3 Parking spaces shall be identified by a vertical sign incorporating the international symbol for access by persons with disabilities, in accordance with 4.2. The international symbol shall also be clearly painted on the road surface (see figure 2) and it shall be 1 000 mm × 1 000 mm.

NOTE: Road signs for persons with disabilities should be provided in accordance with the latest edition of The Southern African Development Community Road Traffic Signs Manual (SADC RTSM) published by the Department of Transport.

Links

To find a Service Provider or Organization that can assist you with Services listed on this page, visit our "Services" Search Facility on the following link: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/services/ or visit our Products page: http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/search-for-info/products-equipment/ to find out more about the Products that are available for you.

Disclaimer

Please note that the FREE services and website that we offer is privately run & funded and is not run or funded by the Government or any Organization. We therefore rely on advertising and donations to continue to supply and improve this Free service. The Companies, Clubs, Schools and Organizations that have their logos on this site, have advertised or made donations to the Website and have therefore assisted us be able to continue to offer this free Service. Please support them as they have supported Us and please contact us if you can advertise with us or would like to make a donation!

N.B: This Website is continually changing and being improved some sections may therefor be incomplete or have links and contact details that are outdated. We are making every effort to keep this to a minimum, so we ask for your patients in this regard and to please Contact Us if you notice that your Companies, Clubs, Schools or Organizations details are incorrect or have changed.

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References

Silver Level Advert
The National Council of and for Persons with Disabilities
The QuadPara Association of South Africa (QASA)
Inclusive Design

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