Menu

Accessible Features & Disabled Parking Discs

Contents: To jump to the topic you would like, click on the links below

Introduction

Government Regulations have been put in place in South Africa and around the world to make public places more accessible to persons with disabilities, including persons with Mobility Impairments. These government regulations are known as Accessible Features and they ensure that accommodation and transport is accessible and that equal opportunities and rights are available for persons with disabilities. These Accessible Features have been introduced by mostly the Government, to make public places more accessible to people with disabilities. On this page, we will discuss the Accessible Features that have been introduced in order to make public places more accessible to people with Mobility Impairments. For people with physical disabilities funding, accessibility and safety are primary issues & the disability rights movement is there to secure equal opportunities and equal rights for people with disabilities. The specific goals and demands of the movement are:

  • accessibility and safety in transportation, architecture, and the physical environment
  • equal opportunities in independent living
  • employment equity, education, and housing
  • Freedom from abuse, neglect, and violations of patients' rights.

Effective civil rights legislation is sought in order to secure these opportunities and rights & access to public areas such as city streets and public buildings and restrooms are some of the more visible changes brought about in recent decades. A noticeable change in some parts of the world is the installation of elevators, automatic doors, wide doors and corridors, transit lifts, wheelchair ramps, curb cuts, and the elimination of unnecessary steps where ramps and elevators are not available, allowing people in wheelchairs and with other mobility impairments to use public sidewalks and public transit more easily and more safely.

Thanks to the disability rights movement, the Government often makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with certain features to make them wheelchair friendly. These are known as The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act, which was amended and published by the Department of Trade and Industry in May 2008. Some parts of the Act Part S deals with facilities for disabled people, and directly affected the building industry. They include information about:

  • Disabled Toilets
  • Ramps
  • Disabled Parking Bays
  • Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts

The National Building Regulations and Building Standards Act

  1. People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets. (Disabled Toilets)
  2. There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.
  3. There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.
  4. Lifts in buildings must be able to serve the needs of disabled people. This includes ensuring that any commonly used “path of travel” MUST be free of any sort of obstacles that would limit, restrict or endanger people with disabilities who use that route. There must also be absolutely no obstacles that will prevent people with disabilities from accessing facilities within the building. The regulations refer specifically to people with impaired vision, but clearly they also relate to people in wheelchairs, or people who have trouble walking freely.
  5. Buildings that incorporate halls or auditoriums for public use are obliged to ensure that a reasonable percentage of space is available for people in wheelchairs or other “assistive devices”. (Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts)
  6. The National Building Regulations also state that where there is parking available for more than 50 motor vehicles, there must  be parking facilities that accommodate disabled persons. There is also an obligation to ensure that persons with disabilities are provided with a suitable means of access from the parking area to the ground floor – or storey – of the building. (Disabled Parking Bays)

Signagedisabled parking sign

The International Symbol of Access (ISA), also known as the (International) Wheelchair Symbol, consists of a blue square overlaid in white with a stylized image of a wheelchair. It is maintained as an international standard, ISO 7001 image of the International Commission on Technology and Accessibility (ICTA)

The symbol is often seen where access has been improved, particularly for wheelchair users, but also for other disability issues. Frequently, the symbol shows the removal of environmental barriers, such as steps, to help the disabled, elderly, parents with baby carriages, and travellers. Universal design aims to obviate such symbols by creating products and facilities that are accessible to nearly all users from the start. The wheelchair symbol is "International" and therefore not accompanied by Braille in any particular language.

Specific uses of the ISA include:

  • Marking a parking space reserved for vehicles used by people with disabilities/blue badge holders
  • Marking a vehicle used by a person with a disability, often for permission to use a space
  • Marking a public lavatory with facilities designed for wheelchair users
  • Indicating a button to activate an automatic door
  • Indicating an accessible transit station or vehicle
  • Indicating a transit route that uses accessible vehicles

Providing clear and visible marking by using this accessible disabled sign is essential in making facilities visible for those who need them. The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations therefore makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes regulations on Signage.

Facilities that are included in a building specifically for use by persons with disabilities, such as wheelchair-accessible parking spaces, wheelchair-accessible toilets, and platform or stair lifts, shall be indicated by the international symbol for access.

Read More: ....

Disabled Toiletsdisabled toilets

An accessible toilet is a special toilet designed to accommodate people with physical disabilities. They are sometimes known as Disabled Toilets.

Public toilets can present accessibility challenges for people with disabilities, such as those people in wheelchairs. Stalls may not be able to fit a wheelchair, and transferring between the wheelchair and the toilet seat may pose a challenge. Accessible toilets are designed to address these issues by providing more space and bars for users to grab and hold during transfers.

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain amount of Disabled Toilets.

In any building where facilities for persons with disabilities are required in terms of Regulation S1 (see annex A), there shall be one or more toilets or unisex toilet facilities suitable for use by wheelchair users.

People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets.

These Disabled Toilets:

  • follow certain regulations
  • Need larger floor space than other cubicles to allow space for a wheelchair to maneuver. This space is also useful for people who are not necessarily wheelchair users, but still need physical support from someone else.
  • Have a wheelchair-height changing table is also recommended, but remains rarely available. Accessible changing tables are low and accessible to a wheelchair user, and long enough for a caretaker to change an older child or adult with a disability.
  • Have a wheelchair-height toilet, to help the user on and off the toilet, with handles (grab bars)
  • Have an emergency alarm, in the form of a red cord that reaches the ground, connected to a buzzer and a flashing red light
  • Have a wheelchair-height sink and hand dryer.
  • Have wheelchair-width doors leading to it, allowing sufficient space for a wheelchair when a door is open.

Read More:...

Ramps

A wheelchair ramp is an inclined plane installed in addition to or instead of stairs. Ramps permit wheelchair users, as well as people pushing strollers, carts, or other wheeled objects, to more easily access a building.

A wheelchair ramp can be permanent, semi-permanent or portable. Permanent ramps are designed to be bolted or otherwise attached in place. Semi-permanent ramps rest on top of the ground or concrete pad and are commonly used for the short term. Permanent and semi-permanent ramps are usually of aluminum, concrete or wood.ramps

Ramps must be carefully designed in order to be useful. Many jurisdictions have established minimum widths and maximum slopes. A less steep rise can be easier for a wheelchair user to navigate, as well as safer in wet or icy conditions.

The South African National Standard for Building Regulations state that Wheelchair ramps (or other ways for wheelchair users to access a building, such as a wheelchair lift) are required in new construction for public accommodations in South Africa. They also state that these wheelchair Lifts & Ramps must meet certain regulations & requirements.

People with disabilities should be able to safely enter the building (Ramps) and be able to safely use all the facilities within it – specifically toilets. (Disabled Toilets)

There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

Read More: ...

Disabled Parking Bays & Disabled Parking Discs

One of the many "Accessible Features" that the government has introduced, is "Wheelchair Parking." The Government has introduced certain regulation that state, how many of these "Wheelchair Parking Bays" must be available & the size of the "Wheelchair Parking Bays"

The National Building Regulations state that where there is parking available for more than 50 motor vehicles, there must  be parking facilities that accommodate disabled persons. There is also an obligation to ensure that persons with disabilities are provided with a suitable means of access from the parking area to the ground floor – or storey – of the building.

These parking bays are not only close to the entrance, but are also wider than the disabled parking placeaverage parking bay. Wheelchair parking bays are traditionally 3500mm wide to cater for a wheelchair user who needs the extra space to enter or exit the vehicle, thus enabling:

  • a wheelchair user to transfer into their wheelchair from their car.
  • It enables the helper of a severely disabled person to park the wheelchair next to the car so that they can lift the person from the car and place him into the wheelchair.
  • It also enables the helper of a severely disabled person to offload a person from a kombi in a wheelchair down ramps or with a wheelchair lift.

By having this extra space helps these transfers to be done safely for the wheelchair user & helps prevent the vehicle in the parking space next door from getting damaged.

Read More:...

Accessible Routes & Doorways

An important part of accessibility is not only accessible parking spaces, passenger loading zones, ramps, Disabled Toilets & Lifts, etc but also insuring that there are various accessible routes from the public streets onto the pavements & to the accessible building entrance and to the facilities inside the building & visa versa. Appropriate accessible routes should also be made available for emergency exits. Accessible Routes include:

  • Ramps on & off the pavement
  • Wide enough walkways for a variety of size wheelchairs
  • No obstacles on these pathways
  • Wide doorways & turning areas, etc

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations passes  laws that insure that new buildings & structures are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes regulations on Accessible Routes.

There must be a means of access that is suitable for people with disabilities to use. In addition, access must be available from various approaches of the building via the main entrance and any secondary entrances, and should lead to the ground floor.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

Read More: ...

Lifts

Thanks partly to the disability rights movement we have seen an improvement in building accessibility. With the installation of elevators or lifts buildings are now accessible even if you in a wheelchairs

A lift (or elevator) is a form of vertical transportation between building floors, levels or decks, commonly used in offices, public buildings and other types of multi-storey accommodation.

Lifts can be essential for providing vertical circulation, particularly in tall buildings, for wheelchair and other non-ambulant building users and for the vertical transportation of goods. Some lifts may also be used for firefighting and evacuation purposes.

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations therefore makes laws that insure that new buildings are designed & build with a certain regulations, which includes Lifts & the regulations set aside for these Lifts.

There must be a means of egress (a point of departure) that is suitable for people with disabilities to use in the event of any sort of emergency. This relates to any sort of emergency, but in addition, a further clause states that departure routes (or egress) must also be designed in accordance with Part T of the regulations, namely the section that relates to Fire Protection.

Lifts in buildings must be able to serve the needs of disabled people. This includes ensuring that any commonly used “path of travel” MUST be free of any sort of obstacles that would limit, restrict or endanger people with disabilities who use that route. There must also be absolutely no obstacles that will prevent people with disabilities from accessing facilities within the building. The regulations refer specifically to people with impaired vision, but clearly they also relate to people in wheelchairs, or people who have trouble walking freely.

Read More: ....

Disabled seating in Auditoriums, grandstands & halls

In South Africa & around the world buildings such as Auditoriums, grandstands, halls & sports stadiums are made wheelchair friendly by adding among other things, wheelchair platforms, so that wheelchair users can enjoy the event from their wheelchairs & also have a clear view of the stage, field, screen, etc.sports stands

Buildings where these "platforms" are build include:

  • Movie Theaters
  • Sports Stadiums
  • Music Concerts, etc

The South African Government through The South African National Standard for Building Regulations  makes laws that insure that these type of buildings are designed & build with these wheelchair bays/platforms & that they meet certain regulations.

Buildings that incorporate halls or auditoriums for public use are obliged to ensure that a reasonable percentage of space is available for people in wheelchairs or other “assistive devices”. (Disabled Bays in Movie Theaters, Sports stadiums & Music Concerts)

Read More: ....

Links

References

Gold Level Advert

Please follow & like us

RSS
Follow by Email
Facebook
Facebook
Google+
http://disabilityinfosa.co.za/mobility-impairments/current-accessible-features">
Twitter